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An Analysis of Employees’ Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
Unformatted Document Text:  Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes 9 Dansereau, Graen, and Haga (1975) posit that negotiating latitude, the extent to which superiors are willing to consider employees’ requests concerning role development, is prototypical of high quality LMX relationships. An investigation of dyadic loyalty (Jennings, 1967) indicates that in-group (i.e., high quality) relationships thrive on openness to ideas, reciprocal support, and propensity to protect subordinates (Graen & Cashman, 1975). Fairhurst and Chandler’s (1989) analysis of superior-subordinate dialogues portrays supervisors shaping interactions based on the trustworthiness of subordinates’ ideas. They indicate that high quality LMX supervisor-subordinate dyads have comparatively collaborative exchanges, which are characterized by ample interactions, offers, and counter offers with minimal power and status differences. As interaction patterns evidenced in high quality relationships are likely to carry over to role negotiation episodes, high LMX employees are likely to use their access to present ideas and plans and ask questions of supervisors at length. High LMX employees are also likely to focus their information seeking efforts on supervisory reactions to role change ideas and the soliciting of suggestions. Elements of trust and support present in high quality LMX relationships are also likely to facilitate these employees’ engagement in problem-solving and logrolling to attain desired role changes. In contrast, low quality LMX employees exhibit communication behaviors indicative of low trust in their supervisors such as avoiding interactions, deception and distortion, restrained expression, and few attempts at creating closeness (Lee & Jablin, 1995). Low LMX employees with dominant managers have less decision involvement, less negotiating latitude, and poorer performance ratings than high LMX employees (Fairhurst et al., 1987). As such, in low LMX dyads there are fewer opportunities to discuss issues, and those discussions are characterized by supervisory use of downward influence, giving instructions, few suggestions, and a general unwillingness to continue discussions (Fairhurst & Chandler, 1989; Graen & Cashman, 1975). In the face of such obstacles, low LMX employees are likely to exert considerable energy justifying

Authors: Callies, Letticia. and Miller, Vernon.
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Recalled Role Negotiation Episodes
9
Dansereau, Graen, and Haga (1975) posit that negotiating latitude, the extent to which
superiors are willing to consider employees’ requests concerning role development, is prototypical
of high quality LMX relationships. An investigation of dyadic loyalty (Jennings, 1967) indicates
that in-group (i.e., high quality) relationships thrive on openness to ideas, reciprocal support, and
propensity to protect subordinates (Graen & Cashman, 1975). Fairhurst and Chandler’s (1989)
analysis of superior-subordinate dialogues portrays supervisors shaping interactions based on the
trustworthiness of subordinates’ ideas. They indicate that high quality LMX supervisor-subordinate
dyads have comparatively collaborative exchanges, which are characterized by ample interactions,
offers, and counter offers with minimal power and status differences. As interaction patterns
evidenced in high quality relationships are likely to carry over to role negotiation episodes, high
LMX employees are likely to use their access to present ideas and plans and ask questions of
supervisors at length. High LMX employees are also likely to focus their information seeking
efforts on supervisory reactions to role change ideas and the soliciting of suggestions. Elements of
trust and support present in high quality LMX relationships are also likely to facilitate these
employees’ engagement in problem-solving and logrolling to attain desired role changes.
In contrast, low quality LMX employees exhibit communication behaviors indicative of low
trust in their supervisors such as avoiding interactions, deception and distortion, restrained
expression, and few attempts at creating closeness (Lee & Jablin, 1995). Low LMX employees with
dominant managers have less decision involvement, less negotiating latitude, and poorer
performance ratings than high LMX employees (Fairhurst et al., 1987). As such, in low LMX dyads
there are fewer opportunities to discuss issues, and those discussions are characterized by
supervisory use of downward influence, giving instructions, few suggestions, and a general
unwillingness to continue discussions (Fairhurst & Chandler, 1989; Graen & Cashman, 1975). In
the face of such obstacles, low LMX employees are likely to exert considerable energy justifying


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