All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

An Empirical Examination of Secondary Task Reaction Times: Testing What They Really Measure
Unformatted Document Text:  What do STRTs Measure? 2 Conversely, Lang et al. (2000) predicted and found that increasing the number of edits defined as “a change from one camera shot to another within the same visual scene” in a message would show an increase in recognition with no overload (p. 99). This is because the edit adds little new information to be processed, hence resources are allocated but are not needed to process the change. Resources Available Slow Medium Fast S T R T m S e c Cuts Edits Thus it is logical to use the number of structural features to manipulate how many resources are allocated to encoding, and the type of structural feature (cut or edit) to manipulate how many resources are needed to process the structural feature. Therefore, fast-paced messages with many edits should leave more resources available than a fast-paced message with many cuts. Examining the four conceptualizations of what STRTs measure outlined by Lang and Basil (1998), we see that a different pattern of STRT results is predicted for this design by each of the conceptualizations. If STRTs measure resources allocated to the message, then STRTs should slow down as the number of cuts and edits increases and there should be no difference between cuts and edits. If STRTs measure resources remaining in the system, there should again be fewer resources remaining for fast paced messages compared to slow, and if cuts require more

Authors: Bradley, Samuel., Lang, Annie., Haverhals, Leah. and Shin, Mija.
first   previous   Page 3 of 4   next   last



background image
What do STRTs Measure? 2
Conversely, Lang et al. (2000) predicted and found that increasing the number of edits
defined as “a change from one camera shot to another within the same visual scene” in a
message would show an increase in recognition with no overload (p. 99). This is because the
edit adds little new information to be processed, hence resources are allocated but are not needed
to process the change.
Resources Available
Slow
Medium
Fast
S
T
R
T
m
S
e
c
Cuts
Edits
Thus it is logical to use the number of structural features to manipulate how many
resources are allocated to encoding, and the type of structural feature (cut or edit) to manipulate
how many resources are needed to process the structural feature. Therefore, fast-paced messages
with many edits should leave more resources available than a fast-paced message with many
cuts.
Examining the four conceptualizations of what STRTs measure outlined by Lang and
Basil (1998), we see that a different pattern of STRT results is predicted for this design by each
of the conceptualizations. If STRTs measure resources allocated to the message, then STRTs
should slow down as the number of cuts and edits increases and there should be no difference
between cuts and edits. If STRTs measure resources remaining in the system, there should again
be fewer resources remaining for fast paced messages compared to slow, and if cuts require more


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 3 of 4   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.