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An Empirical Examination of Secondary Task Reaction Times: Testing What They Really Measure
Unformatted Document Text:  What do STRTs Measure? 3 resources there should be fewer resources remaining for cuts compared to edits. If STRTs measure resources required by the message, then STRTs should decrease as the number of cuts and edits increases with no difference for the type of structural feature. If STRTs measure resources available, then STRTs should speed up as both edits and cuts increase at a fast pace, and there should be a difference between cuts and edits. The current study was designed to empirically test this prediction. The design is a 3 (slow, medium, fast pacing) X 2 (edits, cuts) completely within design. STRT, recognition, cued recall, arousal, and attention will be dependent variables. SAM (Self Assessment Mannequin) and skin conductance (SC) will be used to measure arousal. Heart rate will be gathered to measure attention. To measure recognition we will use four alternated multiple-choice tests, and storage will be measured using cued recall. Resources will be measured using STRTs. Subjects will watch the tapes (primary task) containing related edits and unrelated cuts. When they hear an audio tone they should push a button (secondary task). Time line Stimulus materials already have been prepared. Subjects will be run in January and February. Data analyzed in March and April, and the paper will be ready in May. Lang, A. (2000). The limited capacity model of mediated message processing. Journal of Communication, 50(1), 46-70. Lang, A. & Basil, M.D. (1998). Attention, resource allocation, and communication research: What do secondary task reaction times measure, anyway? In M. Roloff (Ed.). Mass Communication Yearbook, 21, 443-473. Sage: Beverly Hills, CA. Lang, A., Bolls, P., Potter, R.F., & Kawahara, K. (1999). The effects of production pacing and arousing content on the information processing of television messages. Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media, 43(4), 451-475. Lang, A., Geiger, S., Strickwerda, M., & Summer, J. (1993). The effects of related and unrelated cuts on viewers’ memory for television: A limited capacity theory of television viewing. Communication Research, 20, 4-29. Lang, A. Zhou, S., Schwartz, N., Bolls, P.D., & Potter, R. F. (2000). The effects of edits on arousal, attention, and memory for television messages: When is an edit is an edit can an edit be too much? Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media, 44(1), 94-109.

Authors: Bradley, Samuel., Lang, Annie., Haverhals, Leah. and Shin, Mija.
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What do STRTs Measure? 3
resources there should be fewer resources remaining for cuts compared to edits. If STRTs
measure resources required by the message, then STRTs should decrease as the number of cuts
and edits increases with no difference for the type of structural feature. If STRTs measure
resources available, then STRTs should speed up as both edits and cuts increase at a fast pace,
and there should be a difference between cuts and edits.
The current study was designed to empirically test this prediction. The design is a 3
(slow, medium, fast pacing) X 2 (edits, cuts) completely within design. STRT, recognition, cued
recall, arousal, and attention will be dependent variables.
SAM (Self Assessment Mannequin) and skin conductance (SC) will be used to measure
arousal. Heart rate will be gathered to measure attention. To measure recognition we will use
four alternated multiple-choice tests, and storage will be measured using cued recall.
Resources will be measured using STRTs. Subjects will watch the tapes (primary task)
containing related edits and unrelated cuts. When they hear an audio tone they should push a
button (secondary task).
Time line
Stimulus materials already have been prepared. Subjects will be run in January and
February. Data analyzed in March and April, and the paper will be ready in May.
Lang, A. (2000). The limited capacity model of mediated message processing. Journal of Communication, 50(1), 46-70.
Lang, A. & Basil, M.D. (1998). Attention, resource allocation, and communication research: What do secondary task reaction
times measure, anyway? In M. Roloff (Ed.). Mass Communication Yearbook, 21, 443-473. Sage: Beverly Hills, CA.
Lang, A., Bolls, P., Potter, R.F., & Kawahara, K. (1999). The effects of production pacing and arousing content on the
information processing of television messages. Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media, 43(4), 451-475.
Lang, A., Geiger, S., Strickwerda, M., & Summer, J. (1993). The effects of related and unrelated cuts on viewers’ memory for
television: A limited capacity theory of television viewing. Communication Research, 20, 4-29.
Lang, A. Zhou, S., Schwartz, N., Bolls, P.D., & Potter, R. F. (2000). The effects of edits on arousal, attention, and memory for
television messages: When is an edit is an edit can an edit be too much? Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic
Media, 44
(1), 94-109.


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