Citation

Violent and Non-violent Electoral Contention in Sub-Saharan Africa

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Abstract:

This study examines the sources of both violent and non-violent electoral contention in multiethnic states. While political violence in the context of democratic elections has received increasing attention by scholars in the past years, there is much less empirical knowledge about when non-violent forms of electoral contention are preferred by political actors over the use of violence. The paper argues that motivation, in the form of ethnic grievances, and opportunities for collective action provided by weak states strongly influence the occurrence of electoral contention in multiethnic societies. Yet, it is the institutional framework, determining the political stakes of elections, that explains whether this contention is carried out in a violent or peaceful form. This argument is empirically tested in a quantitative analysis of all democratic Sub-Saharan African states from 1990 to 2009. The results show that whereas grievances and opportunities for collective action are the underlying drivers of electoral contention, institutional variables – most importantly, the electoral system and the frequency of the alternation of power – have the strongest influence on the occurrence of violence.
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Association:
Name: American Political Science Association Annual Meeting
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http://www.apsanet.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1116964_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Vogt, Manuel. "Violent and Non-violent Electoral Contention in Sub-Saharan Africa" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, Sep 01, 2016 <Not Available>. 2017-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1116964_index.html>

APA Citation:

Vogt, M. , 2016-09-01 "Violent and Non-violent Electoral Contention in Sub-Saharan Africa" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA <Not Available>. 2017-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1116964_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examines the sources of both violent and non-violent electoral contention in multiethnic states. While political violence in the context of democratic elections has received increasing attention by scholars in the past years, there is much less empirical knowledge about when non-violent forms of electoral contention are preferred by political actors over the use of violence. The paper argues that motivation, in the form of ethnic grievances, and opportunities for collective action provided by weak states strongly influence the occurrence of electoral contention in multiethnic societies. Yet, it is the institutional framework, determining the political stakes of elections, that explains whether this contention is carried out in a violent or peaceful form. This argument is empirically tested in a quantitative analysis of all democratic Sub-Saharan African states from 1990 to 2009. The results show that whereas grievances and opportunities for collective action are the underlying drivers of electoral contention, institutional variables – most importantly, the electoral system and the frequency of the alternation of power – have the strongest influence on the occurrence of violence.


Similar Titles:
The long shadow of electoral violence: How election violence undermines democracy in sub-Saharan Africa

Political Parties and the Closing of the Electoral Market in Sub Saharan Africa

Are Non-Governmental Organizations in Sub-Saharan Africa the Same as Non-Profits Everywhere?


 
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