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An Integrative Model of Entertainment-Education Processes and Outcomes
Unformatted Document Text:  EE theory, 2 An Integrative Model of Entertainment-Education Processes and Outcomes Humans have learned values, morals, history, and knowledge of the relationship between men, women, and gods through the Bible, Homer’s poetry, and other forms of narratives. Modern entertainment-education programs were made popular through the success of the BBC’s The Archers (launched on radio in 1951), Simplemente Maria (aired on television in 1969), and a number of television and radio dramatic serials airing in Mexico, India, Brazil and elsewhere (Singhal & Rogers, 1999; 2002). The success of these programs has prompted increased interest in using entertainment formats to reach and influence audiences in “developed” countries in Europe and the U.S.A. (Alcalay, Alvarado, Balcazar, Newman, & Huerta, 1999; Beck, in press; Bouman, in press; Greenberg, Salmon, Patel, Beck & Cole, in press; Keller & Brown, 2002; Lalonde, Rabinowitz, Shefsky, & Washienko, 1997), in addition to an increased number of E-E projects in Africa, South America, Southeast Asia. Indeed, the United Nations recently launched a major E-E program on AIDS in Africa (http://www.unaids.org). One unique characteristic of the E-E format is its reliance on both emotions and cognition to influence receivers both affectively and cognitively. Emotions are central to entertainment consumption: “What we feel while watching these shows is a central part of the whole psychological experience” (Harris, 1989, p. 25). In addition to being emotionally involved with the entertainment program viewers and audiences also think about the messages and scenarios that arouse us. These messages are processed or absorbed and may consequently be internalized. In order to induce successful attitude and behavior change through E-E, both the emotional and the cognitive aspects of being entertained must be fully understood by the creators of the program (Kincaid, 2002).

Authors: Wilkin, Holley. and Fernandes, Sangeeta.
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background image
EE theory,
2
An Integrative Model of Entertainment-Education Processes and Outcomes
Humans have learned values, morals, history, and knowledge of the relationship between
men, women, and gods through the Bible, Homer’s poetry, and other forms of narratives.
Modern entertainment-education programs were made popular through the success of the BBC’s
The Archers (launched on radio in 1951), Simplemente Maria (aired on television in 1969), and a
number of television and radio dramatic serials airing in Mexico, India, Brazil and elsewhere
(Singhal & Rogers, 1999; 2002). The success of these programs has prompted increased interest
in using entertainment formats to reach and influence audiences in “developed” countries in
Europe and the U.S.A. (Alcalay, Alvarado, Balcazar, Newman, & Huerta, 1999; Beck, in press;
Bouman, in press; Greenberg, Salmon, Patel, Beck & Cole, in press; Keller & Brown, 2002;
Lalonde, Rabinowitz, Shefsky, & Washienko, 1997), in addition to an increased number of E-E
projects in Africa, South America, Southeast Asia. Indeed, the United Nations recently launched
a major E-E program on AIDS in Africa (http://www.unaids.org).
One unique characteristic of the E-E format is its reliance on both emotions and cognition
to influence receivers both affectively and cognitively. Emotions are central to entertainment
consumption: “What we feel while watching these shows is a central part of the whole
psychological experience” (Harris, 1989, p. 25). In addition to being emotionally involved with
the entertainment program viewers and audiences also think about the messages and scenarios
that arouse us. These messages are processed or absorbed and may consequently be internalized.
In order to induce successful attitude and behavior change through E-E, both the emotional and
the cognitive aspects of being entertained must be fully understood by the creators of the
program (Kincaid, 2002).


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