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Exploration of instructional communication environment: Mediated communication and communication apprehension
Unformatted Document Text:  Mediated instructional communication 5 Regarding learning environment, small versus large class sizes have previously been studied in relation to student characteristics. Among such characteristics, various scholars have examined communication apprehension in relation to class size. Andersen and Nussbaum (1990) refer to this point by citing McCroskey and Andersen (1976). According to them, students with high communication apprehension tended to show lower academic achievement in traditional interaction-oriented learning setting, while such a relationship was not found in a large lecture-type learning environment (Andersen & Nassbaum). Some scholars (e.g., Richmond, 1984: Gorham, 1990) discuss communication apprehension and student “preference” for a certain learning environment. The literature generally agrees that students with low levels of communication apprehension prefer small-size classes since that environment allows more opportunities for them to interact with other students as well as the instructor. On the other hand, students with high levels of communication apprehension tend to prefer larger, lecture- type classes where most of the communication takes the form of the instructor talking to the students and the students simply listening and taking notes (Richmond). In addition to the class size preference depending on student’s communication apprehension, past research indicated the difference between students with high communication apprehension and students with low communication apprehension in terms of their preference for the way a class is conducted. According to Richmond, students with low communication apprehension “do not like automated, individualized instruction where they are given objectives, reading or viewing assignments, and tests with no opportunity for interaction with a live teacher” (p. 151). This suggests that the degree of interaction available in a class is also an important factor in considering how

Authors: Sugiyama, Satomi.
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Mediated instructional communication 5
Regarding learning environment, small versus large class sizes have previously
been studied in relation to student characteristics. Among such characteristics, various
scholars have examined communication apprehension in relation to class size. Andersen
and Nussbaum (1990) refer to this point by citing McCroskey and Andersen (1976).
According to them, students with high communication apprehension tended to show
lower academic achievement in traditional interaction-oriented learning setting, while
such a relationship was not found in a large lecture-type learning environment (Andersen
& Nassbaum). Some scholars (e.g., Richmond, 1984: Gorham, 1990) discuss
communication apprehension and student “preference” for a certain learning environment.
The literature generally agrees that students with low levels of communication
apprehension prefer small-size classes since that environment allows more opportunities
for them to interact with other students as well as the instructor. On the other hand,
students with high levels of communication apprehension tend to prefer larger, lecture-
type classes where most of the communication takes the form of the instructor talking to
the students and the students simply listening and taking notes (Richmond).
In addition to the class size preference depending on student’s communication
apprehension, past research indicated the difference between students with high
communication apprehension and students with low communication apprehension in
terms of their preference for the way a class is conducted. According to Richmond,
students with low communication apprehension “do not like automated, individualized
instruction where they are given objectives, reading or viewing assignments, and tests
with no opportunity for interaction with a live teacher” (p. 151). This suggests that the
degree of interaction available in a class is also an important factor in considering how


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