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Young migrants in the borderlands: femicide in Cd. Juárez and the state discourse and initiatives on female working class, brown citizens in the border.
Unformatted Document Text:  14 According to Valenzuela and Manuel (1988), el cholismo“ is the most massive youth phenomenon that emerged among the poor population in the U.S./Mexico border. The Cholo cultural identity on the Mexican side of the border reinforces a group identity that is closely related to class. The cholos and cholas, belong to the social group with the least economic and political power of the urban Mexican border who live continuously in a state of emergency (Valenzuela & Manuel, 1988). Many forms of violence are almost taken for granted and routinized in such sectors: police violence, gang violence, intra-family violence, etc. However, such state of emergency created by the socio-economic changes, is normally invisible and unimportant as long as it remains within the social spaces assigned to marginal neighborhoods . Violence incidents can only be “extraordinary” when members of the “respectable” classes are the target. The deaths of working class, young brown immigrant women in Juárez. According to Diana Washington Valdez (2002), a news reporter from El Paso Times who has covered this phenomenon for several years, there have been 325 murdered women in Cd. Juárez since 1993 up to now and an additional 40 to 60 young women are missing. The general profile of these killed women is that they are very young and slender, had brown complexions and long hair and very poor. Most came from very poor families and many were lured to Juárez by job prospectus at the maquiladoras. Many of them were raped and mutilated; and their bodies were placed in vacant lots in the desert (Washington-Valdez, 2002). These young working-class brown women have been constructed by the mainstream society as women with a double life, of dubious reputation, girls who are not being taken care by their families, bar attendants with love for dangerous activities. The

Authors: Chew, Martha. and Prieto, Leonel.
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14
According to Valenzuela and Manuel (1988), el cholismo“ is the most massive youth
phenomenon that emerged among the poor population in the U.S./Mexico border. The
Cholo cultural identity on the Mexican side of the border reinforces a group identity that
is closely related to class.
The cholos and cholas, belong to the social group with the least economic and
political power of the urban Mexican border who live continuously in a state of
emergency (Valenzuela & Manuel, 1988). Many forms of violence are almost taken for
granted and routinized in such sectors: police violence, gang violence, intra-family
violence, etc. However, such state of emergency created by the socio-economic
changes, is normally invisible and unimportant as long as it remains within the social
spaces assigned to marginal neighborhoods . Violence incidents can only be
“extraordinary” when members of the “respectable” classes are the target.
The deaths of working class, young brown immigrant women in Juárez.
According to Diana Washington Valdez (2002), a news reporter from El Paso
Times who has covered this phenomenon for several years, there have been 325
murdered women in Cd. Juárez since 1993 up to now and an additional 40 to 60 young
women are missing. The general profile of these killed women is that they are very
young and slender, had brown complexions and long hair and very poor. Most came
from very poor families and many were lured to Juárez by job prospectus at the
maquiladoras. Many of them were raped and mutilated; and their bodies were placed in
vacant lots in the desert (Washington-Valdez, 2002).
These young working-class brown women have been constructed by the
mainstream society as women with a double life, of dubious reputation, girls who are not
being taken care by their families, bar attendants with love for dangerous activities. The


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