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Young migrants in the borderlands: femicide in Cd. Juárez and the state discourse and initiatives on female working class, brown citizens in the border.
Unformatted Document Text:  15 newspapers report that these young women had life styles that were of high risk, that they knew their killers, that they dressed in inappropriate way, that they were immigrants, or simply that they had the bad luck of being in the wrong place at the wrong time. The lives of the young poor brown-skin women, the cholas, the Indias, are hardly worth worrying about. Their deaths seem to be almost “naturally” produced and justified. They are invisible and therefore their deaths and killings are also invisible. The real and symbolic violence against inhabitants of shanty towns is crystallized in the tacit approval of the violence against women by many sectors of society. The hegemonic discourse on criminality/deviance/marginality seems to be working among the inhabitants of Cd. Juárez regarding the case of the killing of young women, even if such acceptance is often contrary to the interests of class, race and gender. Zulma Mendez (2002), states: “The idea of the loose women, from Juárez came directly with the transition of Juárez from being almost a ranch, an agricultural community, into a maquiladora city. There is an ambivalence of what to do with these bodies. People do not know what to do with these women who broke molds, and they started to be very sexist…. It must have been very dramatic… things have not changed much. People accept that women work but all the discourse was transformed and so all the problems related to the violence are caused by women because the women are not there at home, there is family disintegration because women are not there. There is a construction of women as herejes, as rebels.” Chola, prieta, india, lomera, naca, puta, are some of the terms applied to working class young brown women in Juárez. The adjectives have emerged as subliminal subtexts in the popular discourses of racial, sexual and class hate that justifies violent actions against women who live en la loma, in the shantytown. Femicide is on the extreme end of a continuum of anti female terror that includes a wide variety of verbal and physical abuse. The extraordinary racist, sexist and classist consensus forged in the

Authors: Chew, Martha. and Prieto, Leonel.
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newspapers report that these young women had life styles that were of high risk, that
they knew their killers, that they dressed in inappropriate way, that they were
immigrants, or simply that they had the bad luck of being in the wrong place at the wrong
time.
The lives of the young poor brown-skin women, the cholas, the Indias, are hardly
worth worrying about. Their deaths seem to be almost “naturally” produced and justified.
They are invisible and therefore their deaths and killings are also invisible. The real and
symbolic violence against inhabitants of shanty towns is crystallized in the tacit approval
of the violence against women by many sectors of society. The hegemonic discourse on
criminality/deviance/marginality seems to be working among the inhabitants of Cd.
Juárez regarding the case of the killing of young women, even if such acceptance is
often contrary to the interests of class, race and gender. Zulma Mendez (2002), states:
“The idea of the loose women, from Juárez came directly with
the transition of Juárez from being almost a ranch, an agricultural
community, into a maquiladora city. There is an ambivalence of what
to do with these bodies. People do not know what to do with these
women who broke molds, and they started to be very sexist…. It must
have been very dramatic… things have not changed much. People
accept that women work but all the discourse was transformed and
so all the problems related to the violence are caused by women
because the women are not there at home, there is family disintegration
because women are not there. There is a construction of women as
herejes, as rebels.”
Chola, prieta, india, lomera, naca, puta, are some of the terms applied to working
class young brown women in Juárez. The adjectives have emerged as subliminal
subtexts in the popular discourses of racial, sexual and class hate that justifies violent
actions against women who live en la loma, in the shantytown. Femicide is on the
extreme end of a continuum of anti female terror that includes a wide variety of verbal
and physical abuse. The extraordinary racist, sexist and classist consensus forged in the


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