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'Creating My Own Cultural Bubble': Cultural Consumption of Japanese Spirituality in Anime
Unformatted Document Text:  G XYG way I view. I don’t put any religious terms, because I’m not too religious and I don’t know about religions. So, I can’t relate to like that. Two related explanations might be possible here. First, they could not relate “good vs. evil” to religion because of their lack of religious language, and it is, in turn, because they are not familiar with the culture of organized religion. Second, the religious discourse like “good vs. evil” is not considered as religious because religion in contemporary society, particularly in the U.S., is so embedded in public communications and popular culture. Especially, since the 9-11, it has been so widely employed that the religious subtext might have been decolorized. This lack of religious references is also demonstrated when they discuss about a pentagram, a symbol often used by Paganism and Wicca, shown on the clip. Eliz: (Was that) The David’s star on his hand? Does it have a special meaning? Matt: It wasn’t a Star of David. It was a normal star. Eliz: It was a normal star? Matt: Yeah. Just a five-pointed star. Eliz: Oh, I just saw it and put that it was, it was something else. Matt: But I don’t know what it stands for, because both of them, the good wizard and the bad wizard had one. Eliz: The good one, too? Matt: The good one had one on the clothes right here (on the shoulder). The bad one had one on his hands. I don’t’ know where else. Eliz: Maybe it can be “zero” wizard. Any kind, I don’t know. Brian and Jill: (laugh) A similar skepticism is also expressed toward American popular culture. Their feelings toward American popular culture in general, television in specific, are articulated in the words such as “boring,” “recycled,” “simple,” “easy,” “always the same thing,” “brainless stuff,” and “too commercialized.” Like the Todd’s accounts below, they show this skepticism by identifying themselves as not the “targeted” consumer of American culture. Whether their ‘real’ cultural practice is consistent or contradictory to this dismissive

Authors: Park, Jin Kyu.
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XYG
way I view. I don’t put any religious terms, because I’m not too religious and I
don’t know about religions. So, I can’t relate to like that.

Two related explanations might be possible here. First, they could not relate “good
vs. evil” to religion because of their lack of religious language, and it is, in turn, because
they are not familiar with the culture of organized religion. Second, the religious discourse
like “good vs. evil” is not considered as religious because religion in contemporary society,
particularly in the U.S., is so embedded in public communications and popular culture.
Especially, since the 9-11, it has been so widely employed that the religious subtext might
have been decolorized. This lack of religious references is also demonstrated when they
discuss about a pentagram, a symbol often used by Paganism and Wicca, shown on the clip.
Eliz: (Was that) The David’s star on his hand? Does it have a special meaning?
Matt: It wasn’t a Star of David. It was a normal star.
Eliz: It was a normal star?
Matt: Yeah. Just a five-pointed star.
Eliz: Oh, I just saw it and put that it was, it was something else.
Matt: But I don’t know what it stands for, because both of them, the good wizard
and the bad wizard had one.
Eliz: The good one, too?
Matt: The good one had one on the clothes right here (on the shoulder). The bad
one had one on his hands. I don’t’ know where else.
Eliz: Maybe it can be “zero” wizard. Any kind, I don’t know.
Brian and Jill: (laugh)
A similar skepticism is also expressed toward American popular culture. Their
feelings toward American popular culture in general, television in specific, are articulated
in the words such as “boring,” “recycled,” “simple,” “easy,” “always the same thing,”
“brainless stuff,” and “too commercialized.” Like the Todd’s accounts below, they show
this skepticism by identifying themselves as not the “targeted” consumer of American
culture.
Whether their ‘real’ cultural practice is consistent or contradictory to this dismissive


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