All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

'Creating My Own Cultural Bubble': Cultural Consumption of Japanese Spirituality in Anime
Unformatted Document Text:  \ Sanctuary; Ranma 1/2). Of course, the most significant religious tradition to provide anime with symbolic resources is Shinto 1 . Its concept of kami 2 and a huge number of deities play an important part in anime storytelling. Many anime are filled with Shinto references. For example, in Tenchi Muyo!, the plaited ropes that identify the space trees are closely connected to the legend of Amaterasu and Susano and images of swords, jewels, and mirrors are the three sacred treasures of Shinto mythology (Levi, 1996). Shinto is frequently merged with Buddhism in anime. In Doomed Megalopolis, a female character Miko is depicted as a Shinto priestess who becomes Kannon, a Buddhist deity, and exorcizes Kato, a powerful demon menacing Tokyo. As well as Shinto shrines, Buddhist temples are important settings for this story. The integration of religious traditions in anime is not limited to Shinto and Buddhism. Judeo-Christian elements are also frequently used (e.g., Revolutionary Girl Utena; Neon Genesis Evangelion). Sailormoon, one of the most popular anime shows in America, illustrate a combination of Shinto and Christianity. It is the story of Hino Rei who is a high-school student and a Shinto priestess in training. She chants “Akuryo Taisan!” to banish evil spirits and tries to find the Messiah, the purest spirit who can handle the power of the Grail. In this anime, many symbols and concepts are employed from Christianity. The use of Christian references is also found in X G “Shinto is the ancient religion of Japan; it has been there since the beginning, so to speak, through for centuries it was nameless. It is as though Shinto was the natural order, and thus required no name. … [T]he name that came into use for this Japanese religion was a name drawn from the Chinese: Shinto is from shen do (dao, tao), which is commonly translated as the Way of Gods. But the connotations of “Gods” for Western eyes and ears are misleading. Shinto is not an Eastern variety of polytheism. Shinto is better rendered as the Way of the Kami (Japanese: kami no michi). And it is with the kami that we come immediately to the heart of the religion.” (Eastman, 1999, p. 257.) Y G p›GšG•–›GŒˆš G›–G›™ˆ•š“ˆ›ŒG’ˆ”G•Gl•Ž“šUGp›GšG–›Œ•G›™ˆ•š“ˆ›Œ‹G•›–GŽ–‹OšPSGŽ–š›OšPSG–™G š—™›OšPUGo–žŒŒ™SGš–”Œ›”ŒšG’ˆ”GšGœšŒ‹Gž›–œ›G›™ˆ•š“ˆ›–•G‰ŒŠˆœšŒG›–šŒG›Œ™”šG‹–G•–›GšœŠŠŒššœ““ G™Œ—™ŒšŒ•›G›ŒGŠ–•ŠŒ—›G–G’ˆ”UG G

Authors: Park, Jin Kyu.
first   previous   Page 6 of 29   next   last



background image
\
Sanctuary; Ranma 1/2).
Of course, the most significant religious tradition to provide anime with symbolic
resources is Shinto
1
. Its concept of kami
2
and a huge number of deities play an important
part in anime storytelling. Many anime are filled with Shinto references. For example, in
Tenchi Muyo!, the plaited ropes that identify the space trees are closely connected to the
legend of Amaterasu and Susano and images of swords, jewels, and mirrors are the three
sacred treasures of Shinto mythology (Levi, 1996).
Shinto is frequently merged with Buddhism in anime. In Doomed Megalopolis, a
female character Miko is depicted as a Shinto priestess who becomes Kannon, a Buddhist
deity, and exorcizes Kato, a powerful demon menacing Tokyo. As well as Shinto shrines,
Buddhist temples are important settings for this story. The integration of religious traditions
in anime is not limited to Shinto and Buddhism. Judeo-Christian elements are also
frequently used (e.g., Revolutionary Girl Utena; Neon Genesis Evangelion). Sailormoon,
one of the most popular anime shows in America, illustrate a combination of Shinto and
Christianity. It is the story of Hino Rei who is a high-school student and a Shinto priestess
in training. She chants “Akuryo Taisan!” to banish evil spirits and tries to find the Messiah,
the purest spirit who can handle the power of the Grail. In this anime, many symbols and
concepts are employed from Christianity. The use of Christian references is also found in
X
G “Shinto is the ancient religion of Japan; it has been there since the beginning, so to speak, through for
centuries it was nameless. It is as though Shinto was the natural order, and thus required no name. … [T]he
name that came into use for this Japanese religion was a name drawn from the Chinese: Shinto is from shen
do (dao, tao), which is commonly translated as the Way of Gods. But the connotations of “Gods” for Western
eyes and ears are misleading. Shinto is not an Eastern variety of polytheism. Shinto is better rendered as the
Way of the Kami (Japanese: kami no michi). And it is with the kami that we come immediately to the heart of
the religion.” (Eastman, 1999, p. 257.)
Y
G p›GšG•–›GŒˆš G›–G›™ˆ•š“ˆ›ŒG’ˆ”G•Gl•Ž“šUGp›GšG–›Œ•G›™ˆ•š“ˆ›Œ‹G•›–GŽ–‹OšPSGŽ–š›OšPSG–™G
š—™›OšPUGo–žŒŒ™SGš–”Œ›”ŒšG’ˆ”GšGœšŒ‹Gž›–œ›G›™ˆ•š“ˆ›–•G‰ŒŠˆœšŒG›–šŒG›Œ™”šG‹–G•–›G
šœŠŠŒššœ““ G™Œ—™ŒšŒ•›G›ŒGŠ–•ŠŒ—›G–G’ˆ”UG G


Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 6 of 29   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.