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'Creating My Own Cultural Bubble': Cultural Consumption of Japanese Spirituality in Anime
Unformatted Document Text:  G _G spiritual seekers, while the focus group interview was used as supplementary method in order to contextualize the informants’ religious and cultural situations within the larger American younger generation. Thus, the data gathered from this technique provide potential explanations of the question why (some of) the younger generation is supposed to be fascinated with anime. Focus Group Discussion The focus group discussion was structured to know how the younger generation perceives the differences between anime and American culture and how they relate their religious identification to cultural consumption. The basic aim of the discussion was to locate anime in the contemporary American culture and to position anime fans in the younger generation’s cultural landscape. Six members of the focus group were recruited from students of two classes at a state university in Colorado. Three female (Kate, Eliz, Jill) and three male students (Matt, Brian, Todd), ranging from freshman to master’s student, participated in the discussion. They are aged 18 to 23 years old and their majors are diverse from Women’s studies to political science, to business management, to advertising. After my brief introduction of the procedure and self-introductions by the participants, I showed them the first ten minutes of an anime called Doomed Megalopolis. The clip has many religious, supernatural images such as Shinto and Buddhist temple, demons, rituals, supernatural phenomena, religious symbols, etc. Three general topics were discussed: perceptions about anime; perceptions about the relationship between anime and religion; and perceptions about the relationship between American popular culture and religion. The discussion was held in a seminar room in the university and it lasted for one and a half hours.

Authors: Park, Jin Kyu.
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background image
G
_G
spiritual seekers, while the focus group interview was used as supplementary method in
order to contextualize the informants’ religious and cultural situations within the larger
American younger generation. Thus, the data gathered from this technique provide potential
explanations of the question why (some of) the younger generation is supposed to be
fascinated with anime.
Focus Group Discussion
The focus group discussion was structured to know how the younger generation
perceives the differences between anime and American culture and how they relate their
religious identification to cultural consumption. The basic aim of the discussion was to
locate anime in the contemporary American culture and to position anime fans in the
younger generation’s cultural landscape. Six members of the focus group were recruited
from students of two classes at a state university in Colorado. Three female (Kate, Eliz, Jill)
and three male students (Matt, Brian, Todd), ranging from freshman to master’s student,
participated in the discussion. They are aged 18 to 23 years old and their majors are diverse
from Women’s studies to political science, to business management, to advertising.
After my brief introduction of the procedure and self-introductions by the
participants, I showed them the first ten minutes of an anime called Doomed Megalopolis.
The clip has many religious, supernatural images such as Shinto and Buddhist temple,
demons, rituals, supernatural phenomena, religious symbols, etc. Three general topics were
discussed: perceptions about anime; perceptions about the relationship between anime and
religion; and perceptions about the relationship between American popular culture and
religion. The discussion was held in a seminar room in the university and it lasted for one
and a half hours.


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