All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Retesting the Marketplace Theory of Media Use
Unformatted Document Text:  Retesting the Marketplace Theory of Media Use—10 addition, it should be noted that control demographics are not depicted in the SEM figures. Their effects, however, appear in tabular form. Our approach to testing varies somewhat from that of Beaudoin and Thorson (2002). With reliance on a modification index to determine relationships among the four main determinants, Beaudoin and Thorson (2002) found that two different credibility measures (minority coverage credibility and mainstream coverage credibility) were at the core of the process. Because we see this approach, as well as that of MacKenzie and Lutz (1989), to be “data driven,” we take a slightly different tack in the current study. We posit reciprocal relations among the primary antecedent measures, with the effects of these measures on newspaper readership mediated by attitude toward the newspaper (A N ). Finally, partial correlations were used as tests of mediation. This strategy is articulated by Baron and Kenny (1986) and applied to mass communication by Eveland (2001, 2002). Mediation can be examined by testing the relationship between an independent variable and a dependent variable and then the independent variable and the dependent variable controlling for the posited mediating variable. In our study, we test the partial correlation of newspaper readership and a primary antecedent controlling for demographics. Then, we test the partial-order correlation of newspaper readership and the same primary antecedent controlling for demographics and A N . The two structural equation models fit the data well. The model for Newspaper A has excellent fit indices (NFI=.998, CFI=.999). Similarly, the model for Newspaper B has an NFI of .992 and a CFI of .994. Each quotient is well above .995. Also important are the squared multiple correlations. For the Newspaper A model, they are as follows: A N (.182) and newspaper readership (.194). For the Newspaper B model, they are as follows: A N (.154) and newspaper readership (.101).

Authors: Beaudoin, Christopher. and Thorson, Esther.
first   previous   Page 10 of 27   next   last



background image
Retesting the Marketplace Theory of Media Use—10
addition, it should be noted that control demographics are not depicted in the SEM figures. Their
effects, however, appear in tabular form.
Our approach to testing varies somewhat from that of Beaudoin and Thorson (2002).
With reliance on a modification index to determine relationships among the four main
determinants, Beaudoin and Thorson (2002) found that two different credibility measures
(minority coverage credibility and mainstream coverage credibility) were at the core of the
process. Because we see this approach, as well as that of MacKenzie and Lutz (1989), to be “data
driven,” we take a slightly different tack in the current study. We posit reciprocal relations among
the primary antecedent measures, with the effects of these measures on newspaper readership
mediated by attitude toward the newspaper (A
N
).
Finally, partial correlations were used as tests of mediation. This strategy is articulated by
Baron and Kenny (1986) and applied to mass communication by Eveland (2001, 2002).
Mediation can be examined by testing the relationship between an independent variable and a
dependent variable and then the independent variable and the dependent variable controlling for
the posited mediating variable. In our study, we test the partial correlation of newspaper
readership and a primary antecedent controlling for demographics. Then, we test the partial-order
correlation of newspaper readership and the same primary antecedent controlling for
demographics and A
N
.
The two structural equation models fit the data well. The model for Newspaper A has
excellent fit indices (NFI=.998, CFI=.999). Similarly, the model for Newspaper B has an NFI of
.992 and a CFI of .994. Each quotient is well above .995. Also important are the squared multiple
correlations. For the Newspaper A model, they are as follows:
A
N
(.182) and newspaper
readership (.194). For the Newspaper B model, they are as follows:
A
N
(.154) and newspaper
readership (.101).


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 10 of 27   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.