All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Retesting the Marketplace Theory of Media Use
Unformatted Document Text:  Retesting the Marketplace Theory of Media Use—14 people held of media coverage and media norms, the more positive was their perception of the newspaper. Perceived news coverage negativity did not play a significant role in either of the models. These findings second previous research involving the role that perceived media credibility (e.g., Carter & Greenberg, 1965; Rimmer & Weaver, 1987), perceived norms for the media (e.g., Lind, 1993, 1995) and demographics (e.g., Pew, 2000; Robinson, 1977) play in predicting newspaper readership. Testing of the Marketplace Theory of Media Use on the two different newspapers, however, suggested several important differences. As noted above, mediation occurred only in the model for Newspaper B. In this model, none of the three primary antecedents or A N have significant paths to newspaper readership. Nevertheless, the squared multiple correlation for newspaper readership is higher in this model (.194, as compared to .154 in the Newspaper A model). The lower squared multiple correlation may relate to the poorer model fit for this model. This seems counterintuitive. The higher squared multiple correlation is found in the model that had nonsignificant links from the three primary antecedents. In total, it appears that demographics account for a great deal of variation in readership of Newspaper A. Thus, readership of Newspaper A does not fit well with the conceptualized framework of product consumption. It does fit, however, with readership of Newspaper B. Because both communities have similar overall levels of diversity, population makeup does not appear as a potential cause of this difference. The effects of demographics, as well, are mitigated by controls. In a broader sense, this suggests that a model of product purchase, with ethnic- specific measures, can be applied to the act of newspaper readership in some, but not all, American metropolitan areas. In addition, we found support for strong relationships of the various antecedent measures. This suggests that people’s perceptions of news coverage that involves ethnic groups are interrelated and can be viewed as important cognitive steps that spur the subsequent behavior of news use. It should be noted that our approach to this testing differed from that of Beaudoin and

Authors: Beaudoin, Christopher. and Thorson, Esther.
first   previous   Page 14 of 27   next   last



background image
Retesting the Marketplace Theory of Media Use—14
people held of media coverage and media norms, the more positive was their perception of the
newspaper. Perceived news coverage negativity did not play a significant role in either of the
models. These findings second previous research involving the role that perceived media
credibility (e.g., Carter & Greenberg, 1965; Rimmer & Weaver, 1987), perceived norms for the
media (e.g., Lind, 1993, 1995) and demographics (e.g., Pew, 2000; Robinson, 1977) play in
predicting newspaper readership.
Testing of the Marketplace Theory of Media Use on the two different newspapers,
however, suggested several important differences. As noted above, mediation occurred only in
the model for Newspaper B. In this model, none of the three primary antecedents or A
N
have
significant paths to newspaper readership. Nevertheless, the squared multiple correlation for
newspaper readership is higher in this model (.194, as compared to .154 in the Newspaper A
model). The lower squared multiple correlation may relate to the poorer model fit for this model.
This seems counterintuitive. The higher squared multiple correlation is found in the model that
had nonsignificant links from the three primary antecedents.
In total, it appears that demographics account for a great deal of variation in readership of
Newspaper A. Thus, readership of Newspaper A does not fit well with the conceptualized
framework of product consumption. It does fit, however, with readership of Newspaper B.
Because both communities have similar overall levels of diversity, population makeup does not
appear as a potential cause of this difference. The effects of demographics, as well, are mitigated
by controls. In a broader sense, this suggests that a model of product purchase, with ethnic-
specific measures, can be applied to the act of newspaper readership in some, but not all,
American metropolitan areas.
In addition, we found support for strong relationships of the various antecedent measures.
This suggests that people’s perceptions of news coverage that involves ethnic groups are
interrelated and can be viewed as important cognitive steps that spur the subsequent behavior of
news use. It should be noted that our approach to this testing differed from that of Beaudoin and


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 14 of 27   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.