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Retesting the Marketplace Theory of Media Use
Unformatted Document Text:  Retesting the Marketplace Theory of Media Use—5 demonstrated two dimensions to news coverage credibility, one specific to minority news and one specific to mainstream news. They found support for the placement of A N as a mediator between the proposed antecedents and newspaper readership. The largest determinant of newspaper readership was age (r=.181), followed by A N (r=.175), education (r=.159), and gender (.098). News Credibility One of the five main components of the MacKenzie and Lutz (1989) model was ad crediblity. They defined it as “the extent to which the consumer perceives claims made about the brand in the ad to be truthful and believable” (p. 51)—and operationalized it with three semantic differential items: convincing/unconvincing; believable/unbelievable; and biased/unbiased. A similar concept of credibility has been central to mass communication over the past two decades (e.g., ASNE, 1985; Fico & Soffin, 1995; Izard, 1985; Newhagen & Nass, 1989; Shaw, 1985; Times Mirror, 1986, 1989; Whitney, 1985). The finding of a correlation between perceived media credibility and media use is important because newspaper circulation levels have been on the decline, as have TV news viewing levels in recent years (Perrucci, 1997; Pew, 2000). Different measures of credibility have been implemented. Shaw (1985) relied on accuracy, fairness, and responsibility, while Times Mirror (1986) used accuracy and believability. Related operational definitions, including bias and depth, have been used by other studies (e.g., Gaziano & McGrath, 1986; Meyer, 1988; Newhagen & Nass, 1989; Pew, 2000; West, 1994). Perceptions of Financial Aspects of Journalism MacKenzie and Lutz (1989) explained that attitude toward the advertiser is “a learned predisposition to respond in a consistently favorable or unfavorable manner toward the sponsoring organization” (p. 53). They measured attitude toward the advertiser with three items: good/bad; pleasant/unpleasant; and favorable/unfavorable. MacKenzie and Lutz (1989) defined attitude toward advertising as “a learned predisposition to respond in a consistently favorable or unfavorable manner toward advertising in general” (p. 54). They measured attitude toward advertising with three items: good/bad; pleasant/unpleasant; and favorable/unfavorable.

Authors: Beaudoin, Christopher. and Thorson, Esther.
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Retesting the Marketplace Theory of Media Use—5
demonstrated two dimensions to news coverage credibility, one specific to minority news and one
specific to mainstream news. They found support for the placement of A
N
as a mediator between
the proposed antecedents and newspaper readership. The largest determinant of newspaper
readership was age (r=.181), followed by
A
N
(r=.175), education (r=.159), and gender (.098).
News Credibility
One of the five main components of the MacKenzie and Lutz (1989) model was ad
crediblity. They defined it as “the extent to which the consumer perceives claims made about the
brand in the ad to be truthful and believable” (p. 51)—and operationalized it with three semantic
differential items: convincing/unconvincing; believable/unbelievable; and biased/unbiased.
A similar concept of credibility has been central to mass communication over the past
two decades (e.g., ASNE, 1985; Fico & Soffin, 1995; Izard, 1985; Newhagen & Nass, 1989;
Shaw, 1985; Times Mirror, 1986, 1989; Whitney, 1985). The finding of a correlation between
perceived media credibility and media use is important because newspaper circulation levels have
been on the decline, as have TV news viewing levels in recent years (Perrucci, 1997; Pew, 2000).
Different measures of credibility have been implemented. Shaw (1985) relied on accuracy,
fairness, and responsibility, while Times Mirror (1986) used accuracy and believability. Related
operational definitions, including bias and depth, have been used by other studies (e.g., Gaziano
& McGrath, 1986; Meyer, 1988; Newhagen & Nass, 1989; Pew, 2000; West, 1994).
Perceptions of Financial Aspects of Journalism
MacKenzie and Lutz (1989) explained that attitude toward the advertiser is “a learned
predisposition to respond in a consistently favorable or unfavorable manner toward the
sponsoring organization” (p. 53). They measured attitude toward the advertiser with three items:
good/bad; pleasant/unpleasant; and favorable/unfavorable. MacKenzie and Lutz (1989) defined
attitude toward advertising as “a learned predisposition to respond in a consistently favorable or
unfavorable manner toward advertising in general” (p. 54). They measured attitude toward
advertising with three items: good/bad; pleasant/unpleasant; and favorable/unfavorable.


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