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Retesting the Marketplace Theory of Media Use
Unformatted Document Text:  Retesting the Marketplace Theory of Media Use—6 Beaudoin and Thorson (2002) measured both the diversity and financial aspects of journalism. They viewed these attitudes as a form of societal motivation, which, in previous research, have been labeled societal influences and social-understanding and have been shown to influence media use habits (e.g., Ball-Rokeach, 1985; Loges & Ball-Rokeach, 1993). McLeod et al. (1998) demonstrated that societal motivation—as measured in terms of worldviews, societal values, and perceptions of normative roles for the news media—played important roles in predicting mass and interpersonal communication patterns. Individual Differences Mood was an important antecedent in the study of MacKenzie and Lutz (1989). They defined it as “the consumer’s affective state at the time of exposure to the ad stimulus” (p. 54). Mood, in this sense, ties in closely with individual differences. In media studies, mood is not a common measure, but individual differences are. For example, Robinson (1978) demonstrated a positive association between age and newspaper readership. Atkin, Galloway and Nayman (1976) demonstrated that education and socioeconomic status were associated with newspaper readership, and Robinson (1977) found that African Americans use less print than Caucasians. Pew (2000) indicated positive associations between news readership and age, education and income. Ethnicity News Coverage News coverage includes an assortment of depictions of people of different ethnic groups. Related research indicates various stereotypes, including the depiction of African Americans as violent, lazy and poor (e.g., Entman, 1992, 1994, 2000; Gilens, 1996). Local news shows African Americans to be violent and threatening toward Caucasians (Entman, 1990, 1992, 1994, 1995, 2000; Gilliam et al., 1996; Jamieson, 1992; Klite et al., 1997). Negative stereotyping is common in Latino and Asian newspaper images (Lee, 1998; Subervi-Velez, 1994), and minorities appear much less often in news coverage than do Caucasians (Beasley et al., 1995; Carveth & Alverio, 1996; Martindale, 1990; Miller 1998; Rodgers et al., 2000).

Authors: Beaudoin, Christopher. and Thorson, Esther.
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Retesting the Marketplace Theory of Media Use—6
Beaudoin and Thorson (2002) measured both the diversity and financial aspects of
journalism. They viewed these attitudes as a form of societal motivation, which, in previous
research, have been labeled societal influences and social-understanding and have been shown to
influence media use habits (e.g., Ball-Rokeach, 1985; Loges & Ball-Rokeach, 1993). McLeod et
al. (1998) demonstrated that societal motivation—as measured in terms of worldviews, societal
values, and perceptions of normative roles for the news media—played important roles in
predicting mass and interpersonal communication patterns.
Individual Differences
Mood was an important antecedent in the study of MacKenzie and Lutz (1989). They
defined it as “the consumer’s affective state at the time of exposure to the ad stimulus” (p. 54).
Mood, in this sense, ties in closely with individual differences. In media studies, mood is not a
common measure, but individual differences are. For example, Robinson (1978) demonstrated a
positive association between age and newspaper readership. Atkin, Galloway and Nayman (1976)
demonstrated that education and socioeconomic status were associated with newspaper
readership, and Robinson (1977) found that African Americans use less print than Caucasians.
Pew (2000) indicated positive associations between news readership and age, education and
income.
Ethnicity News Coverage
News coverage includes an assortment of depictions of people of different ethnic groups.
Related research indicates various stereotypes, including the depiction of African Americans as
violent, lazy and poor (e.g., Entman, 1992, 1994, 2000; Gilens, 1996). Local news shows African
Americans to be violent and threatening toward Caucasians (Entman, 1990, 1992, 1994, 1995,
2000; Gilliam et al., 1996; Jamieson, 1992; Klite et al., 1997). Negative stereotyping is common
in Latino and Asian newspaper images (Lee, 1998; Subervi-Velez, 1994), and minorities appear
much less often in news coverage than do Caucasians (Beasley et al., 1995; Carveth & Alverio,
1996; Martindale, 1990; Miller 1998; Rodgers et al., 2000).


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