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Retesting the Marketplace Theory of Media Use
Unformatted Document Text:  Retesting the Marketplace Theory of Media Use—8 respondent selection and response entry. The response rate was calculated with AAPOR’s (2002) most stringent response rate #1. It was 64%. Measures Measurement involved demographics, primary antecedents, attitude toward the newspaper (A N ), and newspaper readership. (See Appendix for specific statement wording and Table 1 for descriptive statistics.) Attitude toward the newspaper. The current study measured attitude toward the newspaper (A N ). There were two newspapers: Newspaper A and Newspaper B. Attitude toward Newspaper A was measured with two statements (corr.=.469, p<.01), as was attitude toward Newspaper B (corr.=.409, p<.001). News use. News use was measured in terms of days per week. Specifically, participants were asked how many days each week they read the newspaper. Media credibility. Credibility was measured with two scales: accuracy of coverage and negativity of coverage. This approach follows previous studies, including those of ASNE and other scholars (Gaziano & McGrath, 1986; Robinson, 1978). Our perceived credibility measures were specific to news coverage of minority and ethnic groups. Respondents offered their perceptions of the accuracy and negativity of news coverage concerning Caucasians, African Americans, Native Americans, and new immigrants to the area (see Appendix). Responses were on a 5-point scales, with a higher score indicating a more positive perception of news coverage. For accuracy of news coverage, factor analysis (principal-components analysis, with oblique rotation) was used to determine the clustering of responses. For Newspaper A, one factor was identified (eigenvalue=2.680, variance explained=66.004). A subsequent reliability test indicated one dimension (alpha=.84). For Newspaper B, one factor was identified (eigenvalue=2.647, variance explained=66.177). A subsequent reliability test indicated one dimension, as well (alpha=.82). For negativity of news coverage, factor analysis (principal-components analysis, with oblique rotation) was used to determine the clustering of responses. For Newspaper A, one

Authors: Beaudoin, Christopher. and Thorson, Esther.
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Retesting the Marketplace Theory of Media Use—8
respondent selection and response entry. The response rate was calculated with AAPOR’s (2002)
most stringent response rate #1. It was 64%.
Measures
Measurement involved demographics, primary antecedents, attitude toward the
newspaper (A
N
), and newspaper readership. (See Appendix for specific statement wording and
Table 1 for descriptive statistics.)
Attitude toward the newspaper. The current study measured attitude toward the
newspaper (A
N
). There were two newspapers: Newspaper A and Newspaper B. Attitude toward
Newspaper A was measured with two statements (corr.=.469, p<.01), as was attitude toward
Newspaper B (corr.=.409, p<.001).
News use. News use was measured in terms of days per week. Specifically, participants
were asked how many days each week they read the newspaper.
Media credibility. Credibility was measured with two scales: accuracy of coverage and
negativity of coverage. This approach follows previous studies, including those of ASNE and
other scholars (Gaziano & McGrath, 1986; Robinson, 1978). Our perceived credibility measures
were specific to news coverage of minority and ethnic groups. Respondents offered their
perceptions of the accuracy and negativity of news coverage concerning Caucasians, African
Americans, Native Americans, and new immigrants to the area (see Appendix). Responses were
on a 5-point scales, with a higher score indicating a more positive perception of news coverage.
For accuracy of news coverage, factor analysis (principal-components analysis, with oblique
rotation) was used to determine the clustering of responses. For Newspaper A, one factor was
identified (eigenvalue=2.680, variance explained=66.004). A subsequent reliability test indicated
one dimension (alpha=.84). For Newspaper B, one factor was identified (eigenvalue=2.647,
variance explained=66.177). A subsequent reliability test indicated one dimension, as well
(alpha=.82). For negativity of news coverage, factor analysis (principal-components analysis,
with oblique rotation) was used to determine the clustering of responses. For Newspaper A, one


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