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Hispanic Women, Breast Cancer Screening and Preferences for Breast Health Information:
Unformatted Document Text:  Breast Cancer Screening 11 do not seek out information. The intimidated no-action will “read pamphlets or flyers [if they were] sent through the mail.” Implementing programs within the community may create a sense of comfort and a feeling of ease among intimidated no-action women. These women reported that “having classes [on breast health] in the community” are appropriate channels. Making contact with these women takes time because it requires persistence, effort, and dedication of educational providers to personally meet and reach out to these individuals. Intimidated Action Action. Intimidated action women overcome, investigate, screen, and believe. These women overcome obstacles preventing breast health screening such as fear and financial constraints. The fear of cancer is acknowledged and addressed as one participated explained, “ Me, I’m very scared. I don’t even want—you know, that word cancer. Oh my God! So I don’t like to go [but] I go every year.” Additionally, innovative means are adopted to make it financially feasible. Some of these women have insurance, but others take advantage of their proximity to Mexico to address health concerns: “[I] looked for help in Mexico and there they operated and it didn’t cost as much [as in the United States].” Intimidated action women tend to be active in their investigations regarding breast health. One women noted, “It’s said that what I don’t know won’t hurt me but it’s really just the opposite.” They use the resources that are immediately available to them (e.g., pamphlets, flyers, books) and seek out information from relatives, friends, and physicians. The interpersonal relationships are often central in motivating good screening behaviors. For example, one woman reflected on her family’s response to her sister’s diagnosis: “We are all more aware and are diligent … we make sure we get the mammograms and pap smears.” A heightened level of awareness contributes to the intimidated action women’s screening behavior.

Authors: DeVargas, Felicia., Sanchez, Christina. and Oetzel, John.
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Breast Cancer Screening 11
do not seek out information. The intimidated no-action will “read pamphlets or flyers [if they
were] sent through the mail.” Implementing programs within the community may create a sense
of comfort and a feeling of ease among intimidated no-action women. These women reported
that “having classes [on breast health] in the community” are appropriate channels. Making
contact with these women takes time because it requires persistence, effort, and dedication of
educational providers to personally meet and reach out to these individuals.
Intimidated Action
Action. Intimidated action women overcome, investigate, screen, and believe. These
women overcome obstacles preventing breast health screening such as fear and financial
constraints. The fear of cancer is acknowledged and addressed as one participated explained, “
Me, I’m very scared. I don’t even want—you know, that word cancer. Oh my God! So I don’t
like to go [but] I go every year.” Additionally, innovative means are adopted to make it
financially feasible. Some of these women have insurance, but others take advantage of their
proximity to Mexico to address health concerns: “[I] looked for help in Mexico and there they
operated and it didn’t cost as much [as in the United States].”
Intimidated action women tend to be active in their investigations regarding breast health.
One women noted, “It’s said that what I don’t know won’t hurt me but it’s really just the
opposite.” They use the resources that are immediately available to them (e.g., pamphlets, flyers,
books) and seek out information from relatives, friends, and physicians. The interpersonal
relationships are often central in motivating good screening behaviors. For example, one woman
reflected on her family’s response to her sister’s diagnosis: “We are all more aware and are
diligent … we make sure we get the mammograms and pap smears.” A heightened level of
awareness contributes to the intimidated action women’s screening behavior.


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