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Hispanic Women, Breast Cancer Screening and Preferences for Breast Health Information:
Unformatted Document Text:  Breast Cancer Screening 20 strategies and improving the dissemination of information so “the entire world can see it.” They want to deliver information and improve general understanding about the disease without placing complete responsibility on mainstream society, media, or medical professionals. One participant stated, “Good points of community-based outreach are some aspects of shared responsibility-not just relying on health practitioners [to send] the information we look for.” They are active and assist in the process. Along with identification, proactive collectivists envision the steps that mainstream society and local communities need to practice in order to win the battle against breast cancer. These women envision widely accessible information and believe that “[having] computers would be ideal [to obtain] information you want.” Furthermore, they feel that “it would be nice if we got more informational brochures and literature in the mail.” Comments as such create an understanding that breast cancer awareness is increasing yet progress still needs to be made. Proactive collectivists think it is best to “Just put it all in there!” when discussing what type and how much information to dispense. Comments made by the women indicate their vision to make breast cancer a topic that is talked about openly and dealt with directly. Along with envisioning, these women motivate other women to implement the necessary steps to prevent breast cancer. Proactive collectivists (1) talk to their immediate community, relatives, and friends, (2) make sure they are researching and reading the latest information, and (3) implement the three- pronged screening technique. One means of motivation collectivists’ employ is talking about breast cancer with family and friends. Traditionally, talking about issues like breast cancer is taboo in the Hispanic culture. Proactive collectivists recognize that it is difficult for some to talk about health issues. For example, one woman noted that the older generations “didn’t talk about anything…they didn’t talk about the body.” Therefore, motivating family and friends to go get

Authors: DeVargas, Felicia., Sanchez, Christina. and Oetzel, John.
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Breast Cancer Screening 20
strategies and improving the dissemination of information so “the entire world can see it.” They
want to deliver information and improve general understanding about the disease without placing
complete responsibility on mainstream society, media, or medical professionals. One participant
stated, “Good points of community-based outreach are some aspects of shared responsibility-not
just relying on health practitioners [to send] the information we look for.” They are active and
assist in the process.
Along with identification, proactive collectivists envision the steps that mainstream
society and local communities need to practice in order to win the battle against breast cancer.
These women envision widely accessible information and believe that “[having] computers
would be ideal [to obtain] information you want.” Furthermore, they feel that “it would be nice if
we got more informational brochures and literature in the mail.” Comments as such create an
understanding that breast cancer awareness is increasing yet progress still needs to be made.
Proactive collectivists think it is best to “Just put it all in there!” when discussing what type and
how much information to dispense. Comments made by the women indicate their vision to make
breast cancer a topic that is talked about openly and dealt with directly. Along with envisioning,
these women motivate other women to implement the necessary steps to prevent breast cancer.
Proactive collectivists (1) talk to their immediate community, relatives, and friends, (2)
make sure they are researching and reading the latest information, and (3) implement the three-
pronged screening technique. One means of motivation collectivists’ employ is talking about
breast cancer with family and friends. Traditionally, talking about issues like breast cancer is
taboo in the Hispanic culture. Proactive collectivists recognize that it is difficult for some to talk
about health issues. For example, one woman noted that the older generations “didn’t talk about
anything…they didn’t talk about the body.” Therefore, motivating family and friends to go get


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