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Hispanic Women, Breast Cancer Screening and Preferences for Breast Health Information:
Unformatted Document Text:  Breast Cancer Screening 22 educate these proactive women through all avenues because these women serve as pioneers who can motivate and educate the prohibited and intimidated Hispanic groups of women. DISCUSSION The purpose of this study was to identify distinctions within women of Hispanic origin that explain their breast health screening practices and preferences for receiving breast health information. We discovered five distinct character types: intimidated no-action, intimidated action, prohibited, and proactive individualist, and proactive collectivist. Each of these character types had different action and scenes in which they engaged (or did not engage) in breast cancer screening. Furthermore, each character type had specific preferences in regard to the receipt of breast health information. In the present section, we discuss these preferences within the context of prior research and note implications for designing effective communication campaigns targeting various character types of Hispanic women. Discussion of Character Types The intimidated no-action Hispanic woman often deny that breast cancer could happen to them and they espouse faith unto God or a higher being to maintain their health. These individuals also avoid screening measures and breast health information because of discomfort and fear. This character type is consistent with Borrayo and Jenkins’ (2001a, 2001bs) research on Mexican American women’s explanation of why they do not perform breast cancer screening (feeling healthy or feeling indecent). Further, this character type is consistent with the notion of fatalism often attributed to the Hispanic culture (Borrayo, Guarnaccia, & Mahoney, 2001; Tortolero-Luna et al., 1995). This type of women likely does not want to know anything about breast cancer, but the most effective messages are ones that include positive appeals and are delivered by trusted community members in a face-to-face setting (usually their own home).

Authors: DeVargas, Felicia., Sanchez, Christina. and Oetzel, John.
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Breast Cancer Screening 22
educate these proactive women through all avenues because these women serve as pioneers who
can motivate and educate the prohibited and intimidated Hispanic groups of women.
DISCUSSION
The purpose of this study was to identify distinctions within women of Hispanic origin
that explain their breast health screening practices and preferences for receiving breast health
information. We discovered five distinct character types: intimidated no-action, intimidated
action, prohibited, and proactive individualist, and proactive collectivist. Each of these character
types had different action and scenes in which they engaged (or did not engage) in breast cancer
screening. Furthermore, each character type had specific preferences in regard to the receipt of
breast health information. In the present section, we discuss these preferences within the context
of prior research and note implications for designing effective communication campaigns
targeting various character types of Hispanic women.
Discussion of Character Types
The intimidated no-action Hispanic woman often deny that breast cancer could happen to
them and they espouse faith unto God or a higher being to maintain their health. These
individuals also avoid screening measures and breast health information because of discomfort
and fear. This character type is consistent with Borrayo and Jenkins’ (2001a, 2001bs) research on
Mexican American women’s explanation of why they do not perform breast cancer screening
(feeling healthy or feeling indecent). Further, this character type is consistent with the notion of
fatalism often attributed to the Hispanic culture (Borrayo, Guarnaccia, & Mahoney, 2001;
Tortolero-Luna et al., 1995). This type of women likely does not want to know anything about
breast cancer, but the most effective messages are ones that include positive appeals and are
delivered by trusted community members in a face-to-face setting (usually their own home).


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