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Hispanic Women, Breast Cancer Screening and Preferences for Breast Health Information:
Unformatted Document Text:  Breast Cancer Screening 23 Unlike intimidated no-action women, intimidated action women have overcome their fears. These individuals investigate and use screening methods, but do so sparingly (i.e., annual checkups). They implement the bare minimum (i.e., mammography) that is required for proper breast health. They do not utilize BSE and only limited CBE. This character type is not one that is described in previous literature. These women are likely overlooked because they do perform mammography, but they still have needs for breast health information, as they may not find small lumps in between mammograms. Messages for intimidated action women can include fear appeals and references to cultural identity, especially in relation to religion. Fear appeals have some benefit as these women have overcome fear, but the messages should not be excessive (future research is needed to determine that distinction for this character type). Further, these women respond to religious messages as they view God as providing opportunities for helping women (a modified form of fatalism). They can best be reached by mass media channels and especially health care professionals at annual checkups. Prohibited women need to be approached differently from intimidated individuals since they face cultural and resource constraints that prohibit them from screening. These women perceived that adequate resources are not available including time, money, transportation, and that cultural barriers exist. Prohibited women have also been well examined in the literature. Specifically, research that identifies cultural and structural barriers has been targeting these women for a number of years (e.g., Laws & Mayo, 1998; Longman et al., 1992; Perez-Stable et al., 1994; Perez-Stable et al., 1995; Zambrana et al., 1999). Critical factors include reducing the actual and perceived impact of these barriers. Messages should be presented in Spanish and focus on how to reduce the barriers. The messages should be presented in free classes and should

Authors: DeVargas, Felicia., Sanchez, Christina. and Oetzel, John.
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Breast Cancer Screening 23
Unlike intimidated no-action women, intimidated action women have overcome their
fears. These individuals investigate and use screening methods, but do so sparingly (i.e., annual
checkups). They implement the bare minimum (i.e., mammography) that is required for proper
breast health. They do not utilize BSE and only limited CBE. This character type is not one that
is described in previous literature. These women are likely overlooked because they do perform
mammography, but they still have needs for breast health information, as they may not find
small lumps in between mammograms. Messages for intimidated action women can include fear
appeals and references to cultural identity, especially in relation to religion. Fear appeals have
some benefit as these women have overcome fear, but the messages should not be excessive
(future research is needed to determine that distinction for this character type). Further, these
women respond to religious messages as they view God as providing opportunities for helping
women (a modified form of fatalism). They can best be reached by mass media channels and
especially health care professionals at annual checkups.
Prohibited women need to be approached differently from intimidated individuals since
they face cultural and resource constraints that prohibit them from screening. These women
perceived that adequate resources are not available including time, money, transportation, and
that cultural barriers exist. Prohibited women have also been well examined in the literature.
Specifically, research that identifies cultural and structural barriers has been targeting these
women for a number of years (e.g., Laws & Mayo, 1998; Longman et al., 1992; Perez-Stable et
al., 1994; Perez-Stable et al., 1995; Zambrana et al., 1999). Critical factors include reducing the
actual and perceived impact of these barriers. Messages should be presented in Spanish and
focus on how to reduce the barriers. The messages should be presented in free classes and should


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