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Hispanic Women, Breast Cancer Screening and Preferences for Breast Health Information:
Unformatted Document Text:  Breast Cancer Screening 25 groups (American Cancer Society, 2001). However, the risk of narrowing focus is stereotyping and the loss of diversity. Several character types were discovered (intimidated action, proactive individualists, and proactive collectivists) that might provide insight into how to increase breast cancer screening, expanding the scope of the oft-studied character types (intimidated no-action and prohibited). Second, the findings are consistent with recent suggestions about the use of multiple communication channels, sources, and channels for delivering breast health information (Marshall et al., 1995; Rimer, 2000; Yanovitzsky & Blitz, 2000). This study helps to illustrate specific types of messages, sources, and channels that participants report as being most effective for each character type. This information has practical implications for improving social marketing strategies to increase breast cancer screening by Hispanic women in general. The difficulty is to figure out how to measure and find each of the various character types. Future research can help to identify how to do this measurement, identify how extensive each character type is, and whether the reported messages are as effective as believed by the participants. Conclusion This study demonstrated that there were five character types of Hispanic women in terms of breast cancer screening and communication preferences for breast health information. Several of these types were not identified in previous literature, but each is important to fully understand how to deliver breast health information effectively. The results have clear implications for communication campaigns targeting Hispanic women to increase breast cancer screening. Specifically, a “one-size fits all Hispanics” approach will not be as effective as creating multiple messages delivered through various sources and channels to women in their most preferred means. Hopefully, this more complex approach will improve the delivery of breast health

Authors: DeVargas, Felicia., Sanchez, Christina. and Oetzel, John.
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Breast Cancer Screening 25
groups (American Cancer Society, 2001). However, the risk of narrowing focus is stereotyping
and the loss of diversity. Several character types were discovered (intimidated action, proactive
individualists, and proactive collectivists) that might provide insight into how to increase breast
cancer screening, expanding the scope of the oft-studied character types (intimidated no-action
and prohibited).
Second, the findings are consistent with recent suggestions about the use of multiple
communication channels, sources, and channels for delivering breast health information
(Marshall et al., 1995; Rimer, 2000; Yanovitzsky & Blitz, 2000). This study helps to illustrate
specific types of messages, sources, and channels that participants report as being most effective
for each character type. This information has practical implications for improving social
marketing strategies to increase breast cancer screening by Hispanic women in general. The
difficulty is to figure out how to measure and find each of the various character types. Future
research can help to identify how to do this measurement, identify how extensive each character
type is, and whether the reported messages are as effective as believed by the participants.
Conclusion
This study demonstrated that there were five character types of Hispanic women in terms
of breast cancer screening and communication preferences for breast health information. Several
of these types were not identified in previous literature, but each is important to fully understand
how to deliver breast health information effectively. The results have clear implications for
communication campaigns targeting Hispanic women to increase breast cancer screening.
Specifically, a “one-size fits all Hispanics” approach will not be as effective as creating multiple
messages delivered through various sources and channels to women in their most preferred
means. Hopefully, this more complex approach will improve the delivery of breast health


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