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Hispanic Women, Breast Cancer Screening and Preferences for Breast Health Information:
Unformatted Document Text:  Breast Cancer Screening 3 variables that influence perceptions and receptivity of breast health information. Scholars have argued persuasively for the use of culturally appropriate messages and channels for Hispanic women (Perez-Stable et al., 1996; Ramirez et al., 1995). However, there has not been a formal investigation about what culturally appropriate messages and channels entail. Current reports on breast health information indicate that numerous structural (e.g., socio- economic status, age, access to health care) and cultural (e.g., language, acculturation, place of origin, cultural beliefs) factors constitute barriers to receipt of breast health information for Hispanic women and contribute to the limited use of breast cancer screening (Oetzel, 2002). For example, from a structural perspective, availability of health care, insurance, and past experience with breast examination are predictors of positive screening behaviors for Hispanic women (Laws & Mayo, 1998; Longman, Saint-Germain, & Modiano, 1992; Zambrana, Breen, Fox, & Gutierrez-Mohamed, 1999). Age and level of education are additional structural predictors with older and more educated Hispanic women more likely to participate in screening behaviors (Perez-Stable, Otero-Sabogal, Sabogal, McPhee, & Hiatt, 1994; Perez-Stable, Sabogal, & Otero- Sabogal, 1995). From a cultural perspective, low-acculturated Hispanic women are less likely to engage in breast cancer screening practices (Coe et al., 1994; Cueller, Harris, & Jasso, 1980; Suarez & Pulley, 1995); Hispanic women with lower levels of social integration are less likely to have extensive knowledge of breast cancer (Suarez et al., 2000); and cultural beliefs and values held by many Hispanic women inhibit breast cancer screening (Borrayo, Guarnaccia, & Mahoney, 2001; Borrayo & Jenkins, 2001a, 2001b; Salazar, 1996). To address misconceptions about breast health, Saint-Germain and Longman (1993) found that health care providers (e.g., authority figures) and older Hispanic women within a shared social network (e.g., family, friend, colleague, etc.) play a positive critical role in

Authors: DeVargas, Felicia., Sanchez, Christina. and Oetzel, John.
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Breast Cancer Screening 3
variables that influence perceptions and receptivity of breast health information. Scholars have
argued persuasively for the use of culturally appropriate messages and channels for Hispanic
women (Perez-Stable et al., 1996; Ramirez et al., 1995). However, there has not been a formal
investigation about what culturally appropriate messages and channels entail.
Current reports on breast health information indicate that numerous structural (e.g., socio-
economic status, age, access to health care) and cultural (e.g., language, acculturation, place of
origin, cultural beliefs) factors constitute barriers to receipt of breast health information for
Hispanic women and contribute to the limited use of breast cancer screening (Oetzel, 2002). For
example, from a structural perspective, availability of health care, insurance, and past experience
with breast examination are predictors of positive screening behaviors for Hispanic women
(Laws & Mayo, 1998; Longman, Saint-Germain, & Modiano, 1992; Zambrana, Breen, Fox, &
Gutierrez-Mohamed, 1999). Age and level of education are additional structural predictors with
older and more educated Hispanic women more likely to participate in screening behaviors
(Perez-Stable, Otero-Sabogal, Sabogal, McPhee, & Hiatt, 1994; Perez-Stable, Sabogal, & Otero-
Sabogal, 1995). From a cultural perspective, low-acculturated Hispanic women are less likely to
engage in breast cancer screening practices (Coe et al., 1994; Cueller, Harris, & Jasso, 1980;
Suarez & Pulley, 1995); Hispanic women with lower levels of social integration are less likely to
have extensive knowledge of breast cancer (Suarez et al., 2000); and cultural beliefs and values
held by many Hispanic women inhibit breast cancer screening (Borrayo, Guarnaccia, &
Mahoney, 2001; Borrayo & Jenkins, 2001a, 2001b; Salazar, 1996).
To address misconceptions about breast health, Saint-Germain and Longman (1993)
found that health care providers (e.g., authority figures) and older Hispanic women within a
shared social network (e.g., family, friend, colleague, etc.) play a positive critical role in


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