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Hispanic Women, Breast Cancer Screening and Preferences for Breast Health Information:
Unformatted Document Text:  Breast Cancer Screening 7 emerge from stories that are developed as means of releasing tension (Bormann, 1985). Subsequently, communication between small groups or communities results in revelations and the creation of a rhetorical vision (Bormann, 1983). Foss (1996) described the rhetorical vision as the organization of the shared fantasies of a group. Fantasy-theme analysis lends itself to the present inquiry since the text is constructed from a community of women with common goals. Fantasy theme allowed for the interpretation of their pasts to envision their futures. The major characters, actions, and scene were identified within each of the focus group transcriptions. The principal character was the Hispanic woman, which was the focus of the analysis. Descriptions of the Hispanic women were identified throughout the text and grouped together by common themes. Identifying the actions of the Hispanic women followed the classification of descriptions. As with the descriptions of characters, the actions were clustered into similar groups. The scenes in which the actions were performed were identified as well. After the fantasy theme components were identified, the clusters of descriptions of the Hispanic woman were analyzed to arrive at the rhetorical vision. RESULTS Five descriptive clusters emerged from the fantasy theme analysis of characters, actions, and scenes. The analysis focused on the clusters of women that were identified resulting in the development of three groups: intimidated, prohibited, and proactive. The intimidated and proactive women groups include two specific types: intimidated no-action, intimidated action, proactive individualist, and proactive collectivist. Specific actions, scenes, and communication preferences of each character are discussed in this segment.

Authors: DeVargas, Felicia., Sanchez, Christina. and Oetzel, John.
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Breast Cancer Screening 7
emerge from stories that are developed as means of releasing tension (Bormann, 1985).
Subsequently, communication between small groups or communities results in revelations and
the creation of a rhetorical vision (Bormann, 1983). Foss (1996) described the rhetorical vision
as the organization of the shared fantasies of a group. Fantasy-theme analysis lends itself to the
present inquiry since the text is constructed from a community of women with common goals.
Fantasy theme allowed for the interpretation of their pasts to envision their futures.
The major characters, actions, and scene were identified within each of the focus group
transcriptions. The principal character was the Hispanic woman, which was the focus of the
analysis. Descriptions of the Hispanic women were identified throughout the text and grouped
together by common themes. Identifying the actions of the Hispanic women followed the
classification of descriptions. As with the descriptions of characters, the actions were clustered
into similar groups. The scenes in which the actions were performed were identified as well.
After the fantasy theme components were identified, the clusters of descriptions of the Hispanic
woman were analyzed to arrive at the rhetorical vision.
RESULTS
Five descriptive clusters emerged from the fantasy theme analysis of characters, actions,
and scenes. The analysis focused on the clusters of women that were identified resulting in the
development of three groups: intimidated, prohibited, and proactive. The intimidated and
proactive women groups include two specific types: intimidated no-action, intimidated action,
proactive individualist, and proactive collectivist. Specific actions, scenes, and communication
preferences of each character are discussed in this segment.


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