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Hispanic Women, Breast Cancer Screening and Preferences for Breast Health Information:
Unformatted Document Text:  Breast Cancer Screening 9 an external locus of control perspective in which the women cannot control what happens to them. The wife then says, “I’m not going to go because my husband says I don’t have nothing.” Finally, intimidated no-action women avoid. Two avoidance actions were noted. First, some women would “just rather not deal with it [breast screening]” because there is a “fear of knowing what you might find.” These women “want to think that they are not really sick, ” and by not addressing the symptoms or being proactive in screening, they can avoid cancer. As one woman stated, “If I feel bad, I would rather just fix it myself because they [the doctors] may tell me something bad.” The second reason deals with discomfort associated with physicians. Cultural factors contribute to intimidated no-action women’s discomfort. For example, women mentioned the issue of the doctor’s sex: “I just don’t feel comfortable with a man doctor.” Women also explained that personal comfort was an issue: “I think a lot of it is that impersonalization, modesty, or embarrassment . . . not everybody has a comfort level with things like that [CBE].” Finally, some women noted issues of ethnicity (“There are very few Hispanic doctors.”) and language (“[It is] an issue of communication.” “Why go [to the doctor or an educational class] if I am not going to understand?”). Scene. There is one primary scene in which the intimidated no-action women act. Because of their fear and the large amount of intimidation they feel, these women deny, espouse, and avoid from the safety and comfort of their homes. The intimidated no-action individuals use their homes as a haven, where bad news or bad health will not occur. Their home is their “[place] of comfort” or safety net: It provides security and a stress free environment. Accordingly, the intimidated no-action women are reluctant to venture outside of the home for information or resources.

Authors: DeVargas, Felicia., Sanchez, Christina. and Oetzel, John.
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Breast Cancer Screening 9
an external locus of control perspective in which the women cannot control what happens to
them. The wife then says, “I’m not going to go because my husband says I don’t have nothing.”
Finally, intimidated no-action women avoid. Two avoidance actions were noted. First,
some women would “just rather not deal with it [breast screening]” because there is a “fear of
knowing what you might find.” These women “want to think that they are not really sick, ” and
by not addressing the symptoms or being proactive in screening, they can avoid cancer. As one
woman stated, “If I feel bad, I would rather just fix it myself because they [the doctors] may tell
me something bad.” The second reason deals with discomfort associated with physicians.
Cultural factors contribute to intimidated no-action women’s discomfort. For example, women
mentioned the issue of the doctor’s sex: “I just don’t feel comfortable with a man doctor.”
Women also explained that personal comfort was an issue: “I think a lot of it is that
impersonalization, modesty, or embarrassment . . . not everybody has a comfort level with things
like that [CBE].” Finally, some women noted issues of ethnicity (“There are very few Hispanic
doctors.”) and language (“[It is] an issue of communication.” “Why go [to the doctor or an
educational class] if I am not going to understand?”).
Scene. There is one primary scene in which the intimidated no-action women act.
Because of their fear and the large amount of intimidation they feel, these women deny, espouse,
and avoid from the safety and comfort of their homes. The intimidated no-action individuals use
their homes as a haven, where bad news or bad health will not occur. Their home is their
“[place] of comfort” or safety net: It provides security and a stress free environment.
Accordingly, the intimidated no-action women are reluctant to venture outside of the home for
information or resources.


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