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Evolution, Exchange and Coordination: Implications for Organizational Communication

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Abstract:

In this essay, we suggest that evolutionary scholarship shows tremendous promise in guiding future theory-building efforts in organizational communication. To this end, we differentiate that perspective’s assumptions about human nature and behavior from those held by the traditional social sciences and humanities. We argue that there is mounting evidence to suggest that all humans come equipped at birth with the same content-specific information processing mechanisms, and that these are a product of adaptive pressures our hominid ancestors faced during our evolutionary past. We posit also that those psychological adaptations of immediate relevance to organizational communication scholars are likely to be those that center upon our hard wiring for reciprocation and its coordination. We offer several bodies of evidence for our position. Besides the anecdotal evidence that we can all identify with, we offer an analysis of the employee-organization exchange contract, which draws on current socialization scholarship, and a few examples of the rigorous testing of adaptations that evolutionary psychologists themselves have conducted. In addition, we argue that the emotions we display in organizations are strongly tied to our perceptions of equitable resource exchange, and that using emotions as a starting point in our research can help us more readily identify the underlying causal mechanisms for our communication practices. Finally, we point to the universality of exchange and coordination.

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exchang (180), human (160), social (100), e.g (97), communic (96), organ (87), coordin (83), evolutionari (78), behavior (68), adapt (67), evolut (65), new (60), organiz (56), psycholog (52), cosmid (49), see (49), i.e (49), employe (47), reciproc (47), toobi (47), resourc (47),

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evolution, exchange, coordination, organizations
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MLA Citation:

Teboul, JC. Bruno. and Cole, Tim. "Evolution, Exchange and Coordination: Implications for Organizational Communication" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA, May 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111745_index.html>

APA Citation:

Teboul, J. and Cole, T. , 2003-05-27 "Evolution, Exchange and Coordination: Implications for Organizational Communication" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111745_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this essay, we suggest that evolutionary scholarship shows tremendous promise in guiding future theory-building efforts in organizational communication. To this end, we differentiate that perspective’s assumptions about human nature and behavior from those held by the traditional social sciences and humanities. We argue that there is mounting evidence to suggest that all humans come equipped at birth with the same content-specific information processing mechanisms, and that these are a product of adaptive pressures our hominid ancestors faced during our evolutionary past. We posit also that those psychological adaptations of immediate relevance to organizational communication scholars are likely to be those that center upon our hard wiring for reciprocation and its coordination. We offer several bodies of evidence for our position. Besides the anecdotal evidence that we can all identify with, we offer an analysis of the employee-organization exchange contract, which draws on current socialization scholarship, and a few examples of the rigorous testing of adaptations that evolutionary psychologists themselves have conducted. In addition, we argue that the emotions we display in organizations are strongly tied to our perceptions of equitable resource exchange, and that using emotions as a starting point in our research can help us more readily identify the underlying causal mechanisms for our communication practices. Finally, we point to the universality of exchange and coordination.

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Document Type: .PDF
Page count: 38
Word count: 16040
Text sample:
ICA-7-11275 Evolution Exchange and Coordination: Implications for Organizational Communication Abstract In this essay we suggest that evolutionary scholarship shows tremendous promise in guiding future theory-building efforts in organizational communication. To this end we differentiate that perspective’s assumptions about human nature and behavior from those held by the traditional social sciences and humanities. We argue that there is mounting evidence to suggest that all humans come equipped at birth with the same content-specific information processing mechanisms and that these are
and natural selection: A critique of some current evolutionary thought. Princeton New Jersey: Princeton University Press. Wilson E.O. (1975). Sociobiology: The New Synthesis. Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press. Wilson E.O. (1998). Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge. New York: Random House. Wilson R. & Keil F. (1999). The MIT Encyclopedia of the Cognitive Sciences. Cambridge MA: The MIT Press. Wright R. (1994). The moral animal. New York: Random House. Wright R. (2000). Non Zero: The logic of human destiny. New


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