All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Evolution, Exchange and Coordination: Implications for Organizational Communication
Unformatted Document Text:  Evolution, Exchange and Coordination 18 what was promised. And, research suggests that new employees who enter a novel work environment with unrealistic expectations are more likely to turn over prematurely (Wanous, 1992). This naturally also affects the organization’s bottom line. Currently, novel technologies designed to lower such costs are being proposed and researched. These really act as anti-cheating devices, as they deflate both parties’ perceptions of the other’s position early in the exchange game. For instance, organizations are moving to more incisive interviewing techniques, which assess a candidate’s ability to engage in the sort of problem solving that he or she might be required to perform at work (Maurer, 2002). In turn, Realistic Job Previews (e.g., Meglino, Ravlin, & DeNisi, 2000; Wanous, 1992; Hom, Griffeth, Palich & Bracker, 1998) and New Employee Orientation Programs (Wanous & Reichers, 2000) are showing promise in providing novel recruits with more accurate perceptions of what the work they signed up for actually entails. Higher commitment and satisfaction, in addition to lower turnover seem to result, as employees see their experiences match the exchange terms promised by the organization during early contractual negotiations (e.g., see Wanous, 1992; see Jablin 2001 for review). Once the organization and the recruit have come to terms regarding their exchange relationship (i.e., what work for what money), the recruit becomes a functional asset to the organization. Early on during encounter though (Jablin, 1994; 2001), the new hire is subjected to additional and more specific reinforcement of the agreed upon exchange terms with the organization. Specifically, through a variety of socialization initiatives (e.g., Van Maanen, & Schein, 1979; see also Ashforth & Saks, 1996), new employees are exposed to more detailed information about expectations for their performance (i.e., more exacting terms of contract fulfillment). Primary socialization agents during this period are the employee’s supervisor and coworkers, with whom the neophyte needs to develop more specialized relationships for resource exchange. These are the people who will ultimately enable the individual to succeed and eventually climb the corporate ladder (i.e., prestige hierarchy). This stage in an employee’s life cycle is characterized by a great deal of ‘surprise,’ (Louis, 1980), or uncertainty (Teboul, 1994), to the extent that a new hire’s perceptions of exchange terms do not match their experiences. Much of this early stage of organizational life is characterized by the rookie’s attempt to secure competencies in order to assure the organization that his or her end of the bargain is being met. However, care is also exerted in seeking help from others during this period of time. For fear of losing any prestige a new hire might have entered the organization with, she or he carefully weighs the social costs (e.g., incurring too many IOUs and being perceived as incompetent) and benefits (e.g., needing critical information) of seeking information (e.g., Miller & Jablin, 1991; Morrison, 1993a, 1993b; Teboul, 1994, 1995, 1999). Relational uncertainty can be particularly troublesome for the new hire during encounter, as social isolation necessarily implies fewer associates with whom to pursue gains in trade. Research suggests that members of a numerical minority are most likely to experience this form of uncertainty (Teboul, 1999; see also Kanter, 1977) and to face

Authors: Teboul, JC. Bruno. and Cole, Tim.
first   previous   Page 19 of 38   next   last



background image
Evolution, Exchange and Coordination
18
what was promised. And, research suggests that new employees who enter a novel work environment
with unrealistic expectations are more likely to turn over prematurely (Wanous, 1992). This naturally also
affects the organization’s bottom line. Currently, novel technologies designed to lower such costs are
being proposed and researched. These really act as anti-cheating devices, as they deflate both parties’
perceptions of the other’s position early in the exchange game. For instance, organizations are moving to
more incisive interviewing techniques, which assess a candidate’s ability to engage in the sort of problem
solving that he or she might be required to perform at work (Maurer, 2002). In turn, Realistic Job
Previews (e.g., Meglino, Ravlin, & DeNisi, 2000; Wanous, 1992; Hom, Griffeth, Palich & Bracker, 1998)
and New Employee Orientation Programs (Wanous & Reichers, 2000) are showing promise in providing
novel recruits with more accurate perceptions of what the work they signed up for actually entails. Higher
commitment and satisfaction, in addition to lower turnover seem to result, as employees see their
experiences match the exchange terms promised by the organization during early contractual negotiations
(e.g., see Wanous, 1992; see Jablin 2001 for review).
Once the organization and the recruit have come to terms regarding their exchange relationship
(i.e., what work for what money), the recruit becomes a functional asset to the organization. Early on
during encounter though (Jablin, 1994; 2001), the new hire is subjected to additional and more specific
reinforcement of the agreed upon exchange terms with the organization. Specifically, through a variety of
socialization initiatives (e.g., Van Maanen, & Schein, 1979; see also Ashforth & Saks, 1996), new
employees are exposed to more detailed information about expectations for their performance (i.e., more
exacting terms of contract fulfillment). Primary socialization agents during this period are the employee’s
supervisor and coworkers, with whom the neophyte needs to develop more specialized relationships for
resource exchange. These are the people who will ultimately enable the individual to succeed and
eventually climb the corporate ladder (i.e., prestige hierarchy). This stage in an employee’s life cycle is
characterized by a great deal of ‘surprise,’ (Louis, 1980), or uncertainty (Teboul, 1994), to the extent that
a new hire’s perceptions of exchange terms do not match their experiences. Much of this early stage of
organizational life is characterized by the rookie’s attempt to secure competencies in order to assure the
organization that his or her end of the bargain is being met. However, care is also exerted in seeking help
from others during this period of time. For fear of losing any prestige a new hire might have entered the
organization with, she or he carefully weighs the social costs (e.g., incurring too many IOUs and being
perceived as incompetent) and benefits (e.g., needing critical information) of seeking information (e.g.,
Miller & Jablin, 1991; Morrison, 1993a, 1993b; Teboul, 1994, 1995, 1999). Relational uncertainty can be
particularly troublesome for the new hire during encounter, as social isolation necessarily implies fewer
associates with whom to pursue gains in trade. Research suggests that members of a numerical minority
are most likely to experience this form of uncertainty (Teboul, 1999; see also Kanter, 1977) and to face


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 19 of 38   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.