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Evolution, Exchange and Coordination: Implications for Organizational Communication
Unformatted Document Text:  Evolution, Exchange and Coordination 28 5. Tooby and Cosmides (1992) also articulate and critique how the SSSM explains the origin of the very social and cultural forces that shape human psychology and behavior. Their position requires considerable exposition and is beyond the scope of this paper. 6. A fair number of scholars have argued that our minds are ill equipped to handle the vicissitudes of modern life. The mismatch between the information-processing equipment we carry and the present day problems we face explains a wide variety of human and social dysfunction (e.g., obesity, or our seeming inability to tackle problems in a non-reactive, systemic manner, which population growth and pollution require) (Tooby & Cosmides, 1992; Wright, 1994). 7. Examples of cooperation between unrelated members of the same species abound throughout the animal kingdom. For instance, vervet monkeys, with brains far smaller than our own, have developed specialized signaling systems for predator flight. Distinct calls are made to other members of the species in the case of threat from eagles, snakes and leopards, as each predator requires a different escape strategy (Skyrms, 1996; Ehrlich, 2000). Such warning cries are often made at the peril of the signaler. In turn, vampire bats frequently regurgitate blood into the mouth of other roost-mates less fortunate in securing sustenance. And, they keep track of those they are indebted to, and locate them among thousands of other bats, when fortunes are reversed (e.g., Wilkinson, 1984, 1990). 8. The ‘gains in trade’ model that underlies reciprocal altruism is symbiotic and asynchronous. This signifies that both parties exchange dissimilar resources in step fashion, waiting for the other’s contribution before nonzero sum gains can be fully realized. Yet, synergy between humans can also be accomplished synchronically, or in real-time, as a convergence of common interests. This idea is more fully explored in (XXXX & XXXX, 2002). 9. For other excellent examples the reader is referred to Buss’s (1989) study on mate attraction and selection patterns in 37 different cultures and Kurzban et. al. (2001) on computational circuitry for the detection of coalitional alliances. 10. Many thanks go to a colleague of ours who, at a recent department crisis meeting reminded us of the ‘dangerous opportunity’ that lies ahead for the group. The somewhat paradoxical term comes from the combination of two Chinese characters “Wi” (crisis) and “Ki” (opportunity) and refers to the dualistic nature of crisis. Any crisis is a crossroads that can yield both dangerous, destructive outcomes, but also a chance for growth, or ‘rebirth.’

Authors: Teboul, JC. Bruno. and Cole, Tim.
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Evolution, Exchange and Coordination
28
5. Tooby and Cosmides (1992) also articulate and critique how the SSSM explains the origin of the very
social and cultural forces that shape human psychology and behavior. Their position requires considerable
exposition and is beyond the scope of this paper.

6. A fair number of scholars have argued that our minds are ill equipped to handle the vicissitudes of
modern life. The mismatch between the information-processing equipment we carry and the present day
problems we face explains a wide variety of human and social dysfunction (e.g., obesity, or our seeming
inability to tackle problems in a non-reactive, systemic manner, which population growth and pollution
require) (Tooby & Cosmides, 1992; Wright, 1994).

7. Examples of cooperation between unrelated members of the same species abound throughout the
animal kingdom. For instance, vervet monkeys, with brains far smaller than our own, have developed
specialized signaling systems for predator flight. Distinct calls are made to other members of the species
in the case of threat from eagles, snakes and leopards, as each predator requires a different escape strategy
(Skyrms, 1996; Ehrlich, 2000). Such warning cries are often made at the peril of the signaler. In turn,
vampire bats frequently regurgitate blood into the mouth of other roost-mates less fortunate in securing
sustenance. And, they keep track of those they are indebted to, and locate them among thousands of other
bats, when fortunes are reversed (e.g., Wilkinson, 1984, 1990).

8. The ‘gains in trade’ model that underlies reciprocal altruism is symbiotic and asynchronous. This
signifies that both parties exchange dissimilar resources in step fashion, waiting for the other’s
contribution before nonzero sum gains can be fully realized. Yet, synergy between humans can also be
accomplished synchronically, or in real-time, as a convergence of common interests. This idea is more
fully explored in (XXXX & XXXX, 2002).

9. For other excellent examples the reader is referred to Buss’s (1989) study on mate attraction and
selection patterns in 37 different cultures and Kurzban et. al. (2001) on computational circuitry for the
detection of coalitional alliances.

10. Many thanks go to a colleague of ours who, at a recent department crisis meeting reminded us of the
‘dangerous opportunity’ that lies ahead for the group. The somewhat paradoxical term comes from the
combination of two Chinese characters “Wi” (crisis) and “Ki” (opportunity) and refers to the dualistic
nature of crisis. Any crisis is a crossroads that can yield both dangerous, destructive outcomes, but also a
chance for growth, or ‘rebirth.’


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