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Depictions of Race and Violent Crime in TV News Broadcasts: The Impact of Exposure on Viewer's Social Judgments
Unformatted Document Text:  News Media & Social Judgments 15 Hypotheses 3 and 4 Hypotheses 3 and 4 posited main effects for sex, with women more likely than men to identify increased responsibility to the male suspect and decreased responsibility to the female victim. ANOVA findings provided support for these predictions. Although no differences based on sex emerged in general assessments of guilt F (1, 84) = .00, p = .97, partial 2 = .00 or perceptions of other’s determinations of guilt F (1, 88) = .44, p = .51, partial 2 = .01, women (M=4.27, SD=.61) were significantly more likely than men (M=4.02, SD=.68) to place higher responsibility for the incident on the male suspect F (1, 111) = 4.35, p < .05, partial 2 = .04. In addition, women (M=2.01, SD=.71) were less likely than men (M=2.36, SD=.95) to place responsibility for the rape on the woman F (1, 111) = 4.97, p < .05, partial 2 = .04. Hypothesis 5 Hypothesis 5 proposed a race by sex interaction such that women would be more likely than men to identify Black criminal suspects as guilty. ANOVA findings revealed no support for this prediction based on either personal perceptions F (2, 111) = 1.90, p = .16, partial 2 = .04 or estimates of others’ perceptions of guilt F (2, 111) = .47, p = .63, partial 2 = .01. Discussion The goal of the present study was to investigate the influence of TV news portrayals of race and crime on viewers’ judgments. When considering that content analyses have repeatedly revealed TV news programming to be particularly unfavorable in its treatment of Blacks (e.g. Dixon & Linz, 2000a; 200b), the extent to which these images impact audience members becomes of increasing importance. In examining this relationship, the findings from the present

Authors: Mastro, Dana., Lapinski, Maria. and Larrumbide, Andrea.
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News Media & Social Judgments 15
Hypotheses 3 and 4
Hypotheses 3 and 4 posited main effects for sex, with women more likely than men to
identify increased responsibility to the male suspect and decreased responsibility to the female
victim. ANOVA findings provided support for these predictions. Although no differences based
on sex emerged in general assessments of guilt F (1, 84) = .00, p = .97, partial
2
= .00 or
perceptions of other’s determinations of guilt F (1, 88) = .44, p = .51, partial
2
= .01, women
(M=4.27, SD=.61) were significantly more likely than men (M=4.02, SD=.68) to place higher
responsibility for the incident on the male suspect F (1, 111) = 4.35, p < .05, partial
2
= .04. In
addition, women (M=2.01, SD=.71) were less likely than men (M=2.36, SD=.95) to place
responsibility for the rape on the woman F (1, 111) = 4.97, p < .05, partial
2
= .04.
Hypothesis 5
Hypothesis 5 proposed a race by sex interaction such that women would be more likely
than men to identify Black criminal suspects as guilty. ANOVA findings revealed no support for
this prediction based on either personal perceptions F (2, 111) = 1.90, p = .16, partial
2
= .04 or
estimates of others’ perceptions of guilt F (2, 111) = .47, p = .63, partial
2
= .01.
Discussion
The goal of the present study was to investigate the influence of TV news portrayals of
race and crime on viewers’ judgments. When considering that content analyses have repeatedly
revealed TV news programming to be particularly unfavorable in its treatment of Blacks (e.g.
Dixon & Linz, 2000a; 200b), the extent to which these images impact audience members
becomes of increasing importance. In examining this relationship, the findings from the present


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