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How to Save the World
Unformatted Document Text:  18 another,” said one experienced director. “Today, organizations seem a lot more comfortable in their niches and are not afraid of approaching each other to address a common issue.” Things are improving but making this remarkable transition takes time. “Simply deciding to pool resources is not nearly as easy as it sounds,” warns the director of a Boston-based agency. “There are still contrasting opinions that need to dealt with openly and it can take months or years before they are ironed out. Sometimes there are simply too many differences and the partnership falls through. It is unfortunate but it happens more often than we would like.” What do you think of government lobbying in terms of your organization? The interviews show that environmental organizations have several perspectives on lobbying and the government’s role in their overall goals. Some hold lobbying in high regard and it takes up a majority of their funds and resources. Other agencies prefer to avoid that arena, happy to let others monitor the current policies so they can spend more time working directly with their members and issues on a local basis. All agencies admitted, however, that lobbying is a crucial part of the environmental movement and should be conducted on all levels of government. Simply stated by one interviewee: “You can’t not lobby.” A comparison of lobbying strategies follows: • An allegiance of 52 member organizations based in Boston sends out action alerts to its active members to let them know what bill is due for vote, why it should pass (or why not), and who should receive its letters and phone calls. It devotes a large portion of its seasonal newsletter to new bills in the capitol, entitled “Report from the Hill.” • A London-based council focused on protected rural landmarks lobbies on a national and local level. It found that it has easier access to local politicians and once they are convinced of an issue, the elected officials a louder voice on the progress of a bill once it reaches the capital. It publishes a free booklet entitled “The Campaigners Guide: Getting Organized and Getting Results.” This booklet outlines effective techniques on letter writing, how to conduct grassroots campaigns, and get one’s voice heard above the din in the halls of Parliament.

Authors: Nordhoff, Andrew. and Downes, Edward.
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another,” said one experienced director. “Today, organizations seem a lot more comfortable in
their niches and are not afraid of approaching each other to address a common issue.”
Things are improving but making this remarkable transition takes time. “Simply deciding to pool
resources is not nearly as easy as it sounds,” warns the director of a Boston-based agency. “There
are still contrasting opinions that need to dealt with openly and it can take months or years before
they are ironed out. Sometimes there are simply too many differences and the partnership falls
through. It is unfortunate but it happens more often than we would like.”
What do you think of government lobbying in terms of your
organization?
The interviews show that environmental organizations have several perspectives on lobbying and
the government’s role in their overall goals. Some hold lobbying in high regard and it takes up a
majority of their funds and resources. Other agencies prefer to avoid that arena, happy to let
others monitor the current policies so they can spend more time working directly with their
members and issues on a local basis. All agencies admitted, however, that lobbying is a crucial
part of the environmental movement and should be conducted on all levels of government.
Simply stated by one interviewee: “You can’t not lobby.”
A comparison of lobbying strategies follows:
An allegiance of 52 member organizations based in Boston sends out action alerts to
its active members to let them know what bill is due for vote, why it should pass (or
why not), and who should receive its letters and phone calls. It devotes a large portion
of its seasonal newsletter to new bills in the capitol, entitled “Report from the Hill.”
A London-based council focused on protected rural landmarks lobbies on a national
and local level. It found that it has easier access to local politicians and once they are
convinced of an issue, the elected officials a louder voice on the progress of a bill
once it reaches the capital. It publishes a free booklet entitled “The Campaigners
Guide: Getting Organized and Getting Results.” This booklet outlines effective
techniques on letter writing, how to conduct grassroots campaigns, and get one’s
voice heard above the din in the halls of Parliament.


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