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How to Save the World
Unformatted Document Text:  4 Environmental public relations is not, however, an issue solely in the United States’ communities. Rather, it is worldwide area of examination. According to Post, Lawrence, and Weber (2002) three issues pertaining to global commons “will have major consequences for business and society…. (These) are ozone depletion, global warming, and biodiversity” (p. 244). Post, Lawrence and Weber (2002) point out further that world leaders have increasingly supported the idea of sustainable development; issues such as the depletion of nonrenewable resources and holes in the ozone are on the top of the many world leaders’ agendas. Additionally, “nonprofit environmental organizations often have global policy goals. Consequently, they pursue transnational objectives by pressuring influential governments and international institutions” (Payne, 171). Public relations practices in the nonprofit sector provide unique challenges, paramount among them the ability to recruit and coordinate volunteers and to raise funds (Kotler and Anderson, 1996; Ciconte and Jacob, 1997). According to Seitel (2001), “Fundraising…lies at the heart of every nonprofit institution” (p. 415). According to Bates (1998), without volunteers charitable organizations could not survive. An understanding of both fund-raising and volunteer recruitment is critical to building a foundation from which to examine the public relations processes within the environmental nonprofit organization. Also imperative is a recognition of the unique demands of the nonprofit’s publics which include volunteers and donors as well as staff, clients, members, media, related organizations, et al. Equally important is an understanding of the roles of the communications staff within the nonprofit. These include: gaining access to community opinion leaders, serving as a board advisor, formulating goals and strategic planning, preparing an annual public relations program, carrying out effective media relations, planning special events, handling employee and internal communications, working with government agencies, et al. (Bates, 1998). Central to working with many of these publics is an effective, pro-environmental media relations strategy which speaks to the unique needs of the nonprofit. According to Lesly (1998), “The ability of the media to create ‘leaders’ and ‘issues’ by succumbing to the most unrestrained publicity hounds was noted as long ago as 1948 by Dr. Paul Lazarsfeld and Dr. Robert Merton….” (p.739)

Authors: Nordhoff, Andrew. and Downes, Edward.
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4
Environmental public relations is not, however, an issue solely in the United States’ communities.
Rather, it is worldwide area of examination. According to Post, Lawrence, and Weber (2002)
three issues pertaining to global commons “will have major consequences for business and
society…. (These) are ozone depletion, global warming, and biodiversity” (p. 244). Post,
Lawrence and Weber (2002) point out further that world leaders have increasingly supported the
idea of sustainable development; issues such as the depletion of nonrenewable resources and
holes in the ozone are on the top of the many world leaders’ agendas. Additionally, “nonprofit
environmental organizations often have global policy goals. Consequently, they pursue
transnational objectives by pressuring influential governments and international institutions”
(Payne, 171).
Public relations practices in the nonprofit sector provide unique challenges, paramount among
them the ability to recruit and coordinate volunteers and to raise funds (Kotler and Anderson,
1996; Ciconte and Jacob, 1997). According to Seitel (2001), “Fundraising…lies at the heart of
every nonprofit institution” (p. 415). According to Bates (1998), without volunteers charitable
organizations could not survive. An understanding of both fund-raising and volunteer
recruitment is critical to building a foundation from which to examine the public relations
processes within the environmental nonprofit organization.
Also imperative is a recognition of the unique demands of the nonprofit’s publics which include
volunteers and donors as well as staff, clients, members, media, related organizations, et al.
Equally important is an understanding of the roles of the communications staff within the
nonprofit. These include: gaining access to community opinion leaders, serving as a board
advisor, formulating goals and strategic planning, preparing an annual public relations program,
carrying out effective media relations, planning special events, handling employee and internal
communications, working with government agencies, et al. (Bates, 1998).
Central to working with many of these publics is an effective, pro-environmental media relations
strategy which speaks to the unique needs of the nonprofit. According to Lesly (1998), “The
ability of the media to create ‘leaders’ and ‘issues’ by succumbing to the most unrestrained
publicity hounds was noted as long ago as 1948 by Dr. Paul Lazarsfeld and Dr. Robert
Merton….” (p.739)


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