All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

From a Behavioral Toward an Interactional Theory of Charisma in Organizations
Unformatted Document Text:  Student Paper Interactional Theory of Charisma 16 person, has been left relatively unexplored. Weber does, however, leave us with one hint as he notes, “the validity of charismatic authority rests entirely on recognition by those subject to it, conditioned as this is by ‘proof’ of its genuineness” (1947, p. 386). Charisma is not charisma unless it is recognized as such by followers. This relational basis for charisma is often discussed in organizational literature (Bass, 1985; House, 1977; Katz & Kahn, 1966) as well as in behavior theories of charismatic leadership. To this extent, Conger and Kanungo (1987) acknowledge that it is widely recognized that, “charisma per se is not found solely in the leader and his/her personal qualities but rather is found in he interplay between the leader’s attributes and the needs, beliefs, values and perceptions of his/her followers” (p. 639). However, Conger and Kanungo go on to suggest that although the relationship between leader and follower may be an important element in the determination of charisma, the more interesting news is about the espoused charismatic qualities the follower will observe and react to. Such a behavioral explanation does not help to provide an understanding of how charisma becomes attributed to roles and offices. In their creation of a dramaturgical perspective on charismatic relationships, Gardner and Avolio (1998) move us one step closer to an answer. The authors suggest, as have I, that researchers have not adequately examined the role of the follower in the construction of the leader’s charismatic image. This process, seen in opposition to one of behavior can be understood as social (Meindl, 1990; Pillai & Meindl, 1998) in which charisma is co-constructed by both leaders and followers. The idea of a charisma as a social construct places it in the realm of action. A particular person, place, or thing provides a service, vision, or strategy needed by an other, and charisma is created in the fulfillment of the action. Gardner and Avolio, (1998) contend that a follower’s perception of charisma does not always come directly from leader behavior, but may be attributed to her because she appears

Authors: Leonardi, Paul.
first   previous   Page 16 of 32   next   last



background image
Student Paper Interactional Theory of Charisma 16
person, has been left relatively unexplored. Weber does, however, leave us with one hint as he
notes, “the validity of charismatic authority rests entirely on recognition by those subject to it,
conditioned as this is by ‘proof’ of its genuineness” (1947, p. 386). Charisma is not charisma
unless it is recognized as such by followers. This relational basis for charisma is often discussed
in organizational literature (Bass, 1985; House, 1977; Katz & Kahn, 1966) as well as in behavior
theories of charismatic leadership. To this extent, Conger and Kanungo (1987) acknowledge that
it is widely recognized that, “charisma per se is not found solely in the leader and his/her
personal qualities but rather is found in he interplay between the leader’s attributes and the
needs, beliefs, values and perceptions of his/her followers” (p. 639). However, Conger and
Kanungo go on to suggest that although the relationship between leader and follower may be an
important element in the determination of charisma, the more interesting news is about the
espoused charismatic qualities the follower will observe and react to.
Such a behavioral explanation does not help to provide an understanding of how
charisma becomes attributed to roles and offices. In their creation of a dramaturgical perspective
on charismatic relationships, Gardner and Avolio (1998) move us one step closer to an answer.
The authors suggest, as have I, that researchers have not adequately examined the role of the
follower in the construction of the leader’s charismatic image. This process, seen in opposition
to one of behavior can be understood as social (Meindl, 1990; Pillai & Meindl, 1998) in which
charisma is co-constructed by both leaders and followers. The idea of a charisma as a social
construct places it in the realm of action. A particular person, place, or thing provides a service,
vision, or strategy needed by an other, and charisma is created in the fulfillment of the action.
Gardner and Avolio, (1998) contend that a follower’s perception of charisma does not
always come directly from leader behavior, but may be attributed to her because she appears


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 16 of 32   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.