All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

From a Behavioral Toward an Interactional Theory of Charisma in Organizations
Unformatted Document Text:  Student Paper Interactional Theory of Charisma 20 of knowledge can be attributed to a long affinity for behavioral theories of charismatic leadership. Being able to distill the practices of effective leaders does us nothing more than help to train and condition better leaders. Behavioral perspectives provide no theoretical framework to begin to understand how charisma can be extracted from the individual and become endowed in an office or symbolic system. An interactional perspective, however, takes into account not only the charismatic practices of a leader or a position, but the attributions of charisma made by the followers. Explaining how this process actually occurs in beyond the scope of the present work and falls into the domain of empirical work. What this current essay can do is much the same as what Conger and Kanungo were able to do for behavioral examinations of organizational leadership, set forth propositions for a theory of interactional charisma to lay a framework for future examination. The various proposition presented here are derived from the above discussion on the important practices of the charisma of office and pay close attention to both the necessary actions taken and received by both the charismatic office and the organizational members subject to it. If charisma in its purest form is unstable, why does it become transformed into a stable office or tradition? Weick (1979) suggests that organizations are in constant movement and the concept is better understood in the gerund form: Organizing. Such an analysis points to organizations as dynamic entities. People and communication are constitutive of the organizing process (Pacanowsky & O’Donnell-Trujillo, 1983) and provide for the organization always in a state of flux. In this we see that organizations have management needs. Unstable, anti- institutional charisma cannot provide for the practical, everyday needs of people who work in an organization. Regardless of the persuasive qualities a leader might possess, charisma will not be able to maintain itself in an organization unless it can also provide for the needs of organizational

Authors: Leonardi, Paul.
first   previous   Page 20 of 32   next   last



background image
Student Paper Interactional Theory of Charisma 20
of knowledge can be attributed to a long affinity for behavioral theories of charismatic
leadership. Being able to distill the practices of effective leaders does us nothing more than help
to train and condition better leaders. Behavioral perspectives provide no theoretical framework
to begin to understand how charisma can be extracted from the individual and become endowed
in an office or symbolic system. An interactional perspective, however, takes into account not
only the charismatic practices of a leader or a position, but the attributions of charisma made by
the followers. Explaining how this process actually occurs in beyond the scope of the present
work and falls into the domain of empirical work. What this current essay can do is much the
same as what Conger and Kanungo were able to do for behavioral examinations of
organizational leadership, set forth propositions for a theory of interactional charisma to lay a
framework for future examination. The various proposition presented here are derived from the
above discussion on the important practices of the charisma of office and pay close attention to
both the necessary actions taken and received by both the charismatic office and the
organizational members subject to it.
If charisma in its purest form is unstable, why does it become transformed into a stable
office or tradition? Weick (1979) suggests that organizations are in constant movement and the
concept is better understood in the gerund form: Organizing. Such an analysis points to
organizations as dynamic entities. People and communication are constitutive of the organizing
process (Pacanowsky & O’Donnell-Trujillo, 1983) and provide for the organization always in a
state of flux. In this we see that organizations have management needs. Unstable, anti-
institutional charisma cannot provide for the practical, everyday needs of people who work in an
organization. Regardless of the persuasive qualities a leader might possess, charisma will not be
able to maintain itself in an organization unless it can also provide for the needs of organizational


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 20 of 32   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.