All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

From a Behavioral Toward an Interactional Theory of Charisma in Organizations
Unformatted Document Text:  Student Paper Interactional Theory of Charisma 4 Weber. Modern theorization of charisma as a behavior quality that can be taught and learned has moved far from Weber’s original writing on the subject. In today’s organizational theories, charisma is synonymous with “effective leadership;” not at all what Weber thought it was in its essence. More importantly, modern writings on charisma in organizations have only theorized half the process. This is logical considering how charisma has been transformed by organizational scholars into a behavioral process (Cherulnik, Donley, Wiewel, & Miller, 2001; Dorian, Dunbar, & Frayn, 2000). Paying attention to charisma as a quality that can be possessed by a leader prohibits scholars from understanding how charisma can be instantiated into an office. Ironically, in Weber’s routinization process (1947), charisma becomes tamed and domesticated by management techniques. The idea of building charismatic leaders has spun out of control in the last five years. Today, the business stacks at any university library are filled with tomes giving tips on how to improve managers by making them more charismatic (Curtis, 1999; Robins, 1997; Temporal & Alder, 1999). As such, behavioral theories of charismatic leadership have largely prevented us from understanding how charisma becomes institutionalized and transformed into charisma of office. This article takes the notion of charismatic leadership as a behavioral quality and flips it on its head, attempting to understand the concept of charisma as it pertains to Weber’s discussion of the “charisma of office.” In this article, I move from, but do not discard, Conger and Kanungo’s behavioral theory of charismatic leadership, which I feel has a had a tremendous and positive impact on studies and development of the qualities of good leaders, and toward a theory of interactional charisma that purports to explain how charisma can become institutionalized in organizations. This is an important topic for consideration because as Eisenstadt (1968) notes, “… the explication of the relations between charisma and institution building is perhaps the most

Authors: Leonardi, Paul.
first   previous   Page 4 of 32   next   last



background image
Student Paper Interactional Theory of Charisma 4
Weber. Modern theorization of charisma as a behavior quality that can be taught and learned has
moved far from Weber’s original writing on the subject. In today’s organizational theories,
charisma is synonymous with “effective leadership;” not at all what Weber thought it was in its
essence. More importantly, modern writings on charisma in organizations have only theorized
half the process. This is logical considering how charisma has been transformed by
organizational scholars into a behavioral process (Cherulnik, Donley, Wiewel, & Miller, 2001;
Dorian, Dunbar, & Frayn, 2000). Paying attention to charisma as a quality that can be possessed
by a leader prohibits scholars from understanding how charisma can be instantiated into an
office. Ironically, in Weber’s routinization process (1947), charisma becomes tamed and
domesticated by management techniques. The idea of building charismatic leaders has spun out
of control in the last five years. Today, the business stacks at any university library are filled
with tomes giving tips on how to improve managers by making them more charismatic (Curtis,
1999; Robins, 1997; Temporal & Alder, 1999). As such, behavioral theories of charismatic
leadership have largely prevented us from understanding how charisma becomes institutionalized
and transformed into charisma of office.
This article takes the notion of charismatic leadership as a behavioral quality and flips it
on its head, attempting to understand the concept of charisma as it pertains to Weber’s discussion
of the “charisma of office.” In this article, I move from, but do not discard, Conger and
Kanungo’s behavioral theory of charismatic leadership, which I feel has a had a tremendous and
positive impact on studies and development of the qualities of good leaders, and toward a theory
of interactional charisma that purports to explain how charisma can become institutionalized in
organizations. This is an important topic for consideration because as Eisenstadt (1968) notes,
“… the explication of the relations between charisma and institution building is perhaps the most


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 4 of 32   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.