All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Beautiful and Bad Women: Media Feminism and The Politics of Its Construction in Taiwan
Unformatted Document Text:  13 Christian Hoff Sommers’ Who Stole Feminism was published in the Feb. issue in Marie Claire, 1996. The title reads: “Paranoid Women: Who Are Provoking Women to Hate Men?” and the subtitle reads, “feminism is not a bad thing, but when a group of fanatical women who claim to represent all women is promoting the idea that men are persecuting women, then there is the problem…. Sommers wishes to do away with the distorted image that women are victims, she wants to reshape and re-balance a harmonious men-women relationship” (101). In the excerpt, Sommers accuses feminists such as Gloria Steinem and Naomi Wolfe of using false statistics to prove that women are victims. She also charges that they adopt un-objective research methods to convince their readers that men are the oppressors. Finally, she claims that these “angry and hateful” gender feminists have alienated women from feminism. In July 1995, Elle introduced Rene Denfeld’s The New Victorians to its readers, pointing out that the victim myth and anti-men feminism are to be confined to the past. In July 1997, Marie Claire uses “Can Feminists Love Men?” as the title and publishes excerpts from The New Victorians. This article states that feminists have largely practiced sexism in the name of feminism, consequently many women have run away from feminism. These “fake feminists,” such as Catherine Mackinnon, are promoting separatism, and they uphold that heterosexuality is the cause of oppression in our society (124). Finally, Denfeld argues that this kind of men-hating feminism which promotes separatism and a sexually-repressed morality can only make women feel estranged from feminism. Both of the excerpts that women’s magazines published caricature the ‘60s and ‘70s women’s movements as old, separatist, man-hating feminism which does not pertain to modern Taiwanese society. After all, women’s magazines claim, women are still women; in addition to gender equality, women still want to be good wives and good moms. However, it is only through a process of exclusion, over-simplification, and misreading that the second wave can be constructed as “old” and “separatist.” Through a “rhetoric of repossession” (Siegel 59), these postfeminist historiographers obstruct any dialogue by first dichotomizing feminism into two camps—such as equality feminism vs. gender feminism and power feminism vs. victim feminism—and then by claiming themselves to stand on the good side of feminism. This dichotomizing of feminism requires them to homogenize feminism, to construct “feminist history the story of a product rather than that of a process,” and to adopt a “metonymic view of the second wave, in which a part of second wave activity is substituted for the whole” (Siege 59). After all, there is no one feminism, but feminisms, and they are marked by contradictions and different voices. Catherine Msckinnon is only one among the second wave, she can not be used to represent the second wave. In fact, there are many critical voices about Mackinnon’s view within

Authors: Yang, Fangchih.
first   previous   Page 13 of 25   next   last



background image
13
Christian Hoff Sommers’ Who Stole Feminism was published in the Feb. issue in
Marie Claire, 1996. The title reads: “Paranoid Women: Who Are Provoking Women
to Hate Men?” and the subtitle reads, “feminism is not a bad thing, but when a group
of fanatical women who claim to represent all women is promoting the idea that men
are persecuting women, then there is the problem…. Sommers wishes to do away
with the distorted image that women are victims, she wants to reshape and re-balance
a harmonious men-women relationship” (101). In the excerpt, Sommers accuses
feminists such as Gloria Steinem and Naomi Wolfe of using false statistics to prove
that women are victims. She also charges that they adopt un-objective research
methods to convince their readers that men are the oppressors. Finally, she claims that
these “angry and hateful” gender feminists have alienated women from feminism.
In July 1995, Elle introduced Rene Denfeld’s The New Victorians to its readers,
pointing out that the victim myth and anti-men feminism are to be confined to the past.
In July 1997, Marie Claire uses “Can Feminists Love Men?” as the title and publishes
excerpts from The New Victorians. This article states that feminists have largely
practiced sexism in the name of feminism, consequently many women have run away
from feminism. These “fake feminists,” such as Catherine Mackinnon, are
promoting separatism, and they uphold that heterosexuality is the cause of oppression
in our society (124). Finally, Denfeld argues that this kind of men-hating feminism
which promotes separatism and a sexually-repressed morality can only make women
feel estranged from feminism.
Both of the excerpts that women’s magazines published caricature the ‘60s and
‘70s women’s movements as old, separatist, man-hating feminism which does not
pertain to modern Taiwanese society. After all, women’s magazines claim, women are
still women; in addition to gender equality, women still want to be good wives and
good moms. However, it is only through a process of exclusion, over-simplification,
and misreading that the second wave can be constructed as “old” and “separatist.”
Through a “rhetoric of repossession” (Siegel 59), these postfeminist historiographers
obstruct any dialogue by first dichotomizing feminism into two camps—such as
equality feminism vs. gender feminism and power feminism vs. victim
feminism—and then by claiming themselves to stand on the good side of feminism.
This dichotomizing of feminism requires them to homogenize feminism, to construct
“feminist history the story of a product rather than that of a process,” and to adopt a
“metonymic view of the second wave, in which a part of second wave activity is
substituted for the whole” (Siege 59). After all, there is no one feminism, but
feminisms, and they are marked by contradictions and different voices. Catherine
Msckinnon is only one among the second wave, she can not be used to represent the
second wave. In fact, there are many critical voices about Mackinnon’s view within


Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 13 of 25   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.