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Beautiful and Bad Women: Media Feminism and The Politics of Its Construction in Taiwan
Unformatted Document Text:  14 the second wave too. Moreover, Denfeld misreads feminism by equating heterosexuality with heterosexism and constructs all feminists as lesbians. However, what feminists criticize is heterosexism and gravitate toward a concept that studies heterosexuality as the product of historical, political and cultural construction. However, these very different positions and complex ways of analyzing sexuality and gender are erased through these postfeminists’ bifurcation of feminism into new and old. The issue of difference, particularly racial and class difference among women, makes a significant chapter in the history of feminism. For example, the notion of “womanist” that Walker proposes aims to reclaim black woman’s power and to critique a (white, middle-class) feminism that privileges sexual difference over racial difference (Siegel 65). With the influence of postcolonialism, the position of white feminism and its relation to imperial expansion is explored and critiqued (Mohanty). All this scholarship emerged in the 1980s and has since changed the way feminism is theorized by attending to the “politics of location.” However, by inflating the significance of sexual difference over racial and class differences, and by reducing feminism to a theory of sexual difference vs. equality, postfeminism erases the heterogeneity of feminist work. However, their views are constructed, marketed, and received as representatives of the entire young generation in popular media (Siegel 65). And it is because of their visibility in popular media in the States that these postfeminist views, through a profit-driven publishing system which only translates best-sellers in the West, are translated into the Taiwanese context. The excerpts from these postfeminist works translated and published in women’s magazines conform to the beautiful-and-bad-woman feminism that popular media promote—a feminism that privileges women’s desire for independence and men. However, these translated works, in the name of feminism, have been incorporated and universalized as Taiwanese feminism. This Western postfeminism uses “we” to interpellate Taiwanese women into a Western postfeminist subject, and in this process of interpellation, it also constructs a Western feminist other who does belong to the present tense. In The Scandal of Translation, Venuti (1998) points out that the process of translation is the process of domestication. That is, in order for local readers to understand a foreign text, the translator is required to use languages and concepts that their readers are already familiar with, he/she even has to invoke stereotypical images to rewrite the translated texts. Consequently, the translated books, in the process of translation, are decontextualized to conform to domestic ideology. Hence, translation involves selection and exclusion, and in this process, it also constructs a subject that matches the demands of the dominant society:

Authors: Yang, Fangchih.
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14
the second wave too. Moreover, Denfeld misreads feminism by equating
heterosexuality with heterosexism and constructs all feminists as lesbians. However,
what feminists criticize is heterosexism and gravitate toward a concept that studies
heterosexuality as the product of historical, political and cultural construction.
However, these very different positions and complex ways of analyzing sexuality and
gender are erased through these postfeminists’ bifurcation of feminism into new and
old.
The issue of difference, particularly racial and class difference among women,
makes a significant chapter in the history of feminism. For example, the notion of
“womanist” that Walker proposes aims to reclaim black woman’s power and to
critique a (white, middle-class) feminism that privileges sexual difference over racial
difference (Siegel 65). With the influence of postcolonialism, the position of white
feminism and its relation to imperial expansion is explored and critiqued (Mohanty).
All this scholarship emerged in the 1980s and has since changed the way feminism is
theorized by attending to the “politics of location.” However, by inflating the
significance of sexual difference over racial and class differences, and by reducing
feminism to a theory of sexual difference vs. equality, postfeminism erases the
heterogeneity of feminist work. However, their views are constructed, marketed, and
received as representatives of the entire young generation in popular media (Siegel
65). And it is because of their visibility in popular media in the States that these
postfeminist views, through a profit-driven publishing system which only translates
best-sellers in the West, are translated into the Taiwanese context.
The excerpts from these postfeminist works translated and published in women’s
magazines conform to the beautiful-and-bad-woman feminism that popular media
promote—a feminism that privileges women’s desire for independence and men.
However, these translated works, in the name of feminism, have been incorporated
and universalized as Taiwanese feminism. This Western postfeminism uses “we” to
interpellate Taiwanese women into a Western postfeminist subject, and in this process
of interpellation, it also constructs a Western feminist other who does belong to the
present tense.
In The Scandal of Translation, Venuti (1998) points out that the process of
translation is the process of domestication. That is, in order for local readers to
understand a foreign text, the translator is required to use languages and concepts that
their readers are already familiar with, he/she even has to invoke stereotypical images
to rewrite the translated texts. Consequently, the translated books, in the process of
translation, are decontextualized to conform to domestic ideology. Hence,
translation involves selection and exclusion, and in this process, it also constructs a
subject that matches the demands of the dominant society:


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