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Beautiful and Bad Women: Media Feminism and The Politics of Its Construction in Taiwan
Unformatted Document Text:  15 Translation forms domestic subjects by enabling a process of “mirroring” or self-recognition: the foreign text becomes intelligible when the reader recognizes himself or herself in the translation by identifying the domestic values that motivated the selection of that particular foreign text, and that are inscribed in it through a particular discursive strategy. The self-recognition is a recognition of the domestic norms and resources that constitute the self, that define it as a domestic subject. The process is basically narcissistic: the reader identifies with an ideal projected by the translation, usually values that have achieved authority in the domestic culture and dominate those of other cultural constituencies. (Venuti 1998:77) In selecting the books to be translated, publishers in Taiwan usually choose Western bestsellers in order to reduce risks. However, these books have to conform to dominant domestic ideology in order to be popular. In the United States, these postfeminist books gained much popularity and media attention; at the same time many feminists within and outside the academia also critically engage with these books as well as the issues raised. However, these critical voices are largely absent in the Taiwanese context. Kinahan, for example, situates these postfeminist responses within a changing academic environment—an environment that has become more open to different voices from people of color and women, and the subsequent fear that this openness brings to the white, old establishments. She points out that by ignoring and marginalizing the works advanced by feminists of color and queer feminists, by labeling the second wave as old feminism, and by caricaturing academic feminism, these postfeminists can reclaim their lost canon—a proper feminism that is white and middle class—within the academy (Kinahan 2001). Heywood and Drake(1997) and Sidler (1997), all of them third wavers, engage with the second wave by critiquing and extending their analysis to issues that are pertinent to the young generation, such as issues of sexuality and pleasure. They also accentuate the historical moment—“in this historical moment we are motivated by despair, uncertainty, and loss of a sense of grounding” (Heywood and Drake 10)—in which third wave emerges. Sidler argues that while the second wave focuses on equality in the workplace and domestic burden, the third wavers have no such choice but to work, but their main concern is economic plight as processes of corporate restructuring create scarce opportunities in the developed countries. Despite the proliferation of multiple voices from the young generation, particularly within the academia, in engaging with the second wave, their voices are

Authors: Yang, Fangchih.
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15
Translation forms domestic subjects by enabling a process of “mirroring” or
self-recognition: the foreign text becomes intelligible when the reader
recognizes himself or herself in the translation by identifying the domestic
values that motivated the selection of that particular foreign text, and that are
inscribed in it through a particular discursive strategy. The self-recognition is a
recognition of the domestic norms and resources that constitute the self, that
define it as a domestic subject. The process is basically narcissistic: the reader
identifies with an ideal projected by the translation, usually values that have
achieved authority in the domestic culture and dominate those of other cultural
constituencies. (Venuti 1998:77)
In selecting the books to be translated, publishers in Taiwan usually choose
Western bestsellers in order to reduce risks. However, these books have to conform to
dominant domestic ideology in order to be popular. In the United States, these
postfeminist books gained much popularity and media attention; at the same time
many feminists within and outside the academia also critically engage with these
books as well as the issues raised. However, these critical voices are largely absent in
the Taiwanese context.
Kinahan, for example, situates these postfeminist responses within a changing
academic environment—an environment that has become more open to different
voices from people of color and women, and the subsequent fear that this openness
brings to the white, old establishments. She points out that by ignoring and
marginalizing the works advanced by feminists of color and queer feminists, by
labeling the second wave as old feminism, and by caricaturing academic feminism,
these postfeminists can reclaim their lost canon—a proper feminism that is white and
middle class—within the academy (Kinahan 2001).
Heywood and Drake(1997) and Sidler (1997), all of them third wavers, engage
with the second wave by critiquing and extending their analysis to issues that are
pertinent to the young generation, such as issues of sexuality and pleasure. They also
accentuate the historical moment—“in this historical moment we are motivated by
despair, uncertainty, and loss of a sense of grounding” (Heywood and Drake 10)—in
which third wave emerges. Sidler argues that while the second wave focuses on
equality in the workplace and domestic burden, the third wavers have no such choice
but to work, but their main concern is economic plight as processes of corporate
restructuring create scarce opportunities in the developed countries.
Despite the proliferation of multiple voices from the young generation,
particularly within the academia, in engaging with the second wave, their voices are


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