All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Beautiful and Bad Women: Media Feminism and The Politics of Its Construction in Taiwan
Unformatted Document Text:  3 I. Fantasy Echo From a poststructuralist point of view, identity does not have an essence, that is to say that identity is not grounded in one’s anatomy or culture. All identities are strategically linked to our bodies or culture so that we mistake this connection to our bodies or culture as natural. Hence, “women” as an “identity category” is not rooted in biology, but is constructed as such repeatedly. Similarly, feminist as an identity category is also fabricated over and again by feminists, and the writing of feminist history plays an important role in constructing this identity category. The history of women’s movement enables feminists to identify with a shared past and hence, motivates them to face a collective future together. However, Eric Hobsbawn reminds us that traditions are invented, and the invented traditions are used to justify, or mobilize certain political actions. Hence, any tradition should be seen as the product of careful processes of selection. However, feminist historians have largely ignored the intervention made by Hobsbawn as they continue to write women’s histories of activism without reflecting on their own inventions. And even for those who concur that collective identities are invented for political purposes, they are slow in attending to the process of invention (Scott, 2001: 286). As an intervention into feminist historiography, Scott criticizes the notion of feminist history as continuous as is written by many feminist historians and proposes that “feminist identity was an effect of a rhetorical political strategy invoked differently by different feminists at different times” (2001:286). This is to say that, the “history” of feminism cannot be explained through cause and effect, but is “a story of discontinuity that was repeatedly sutured by feminist activists… into a vision of uninterrupted linear succession” (286-287). “The identity of women, I argue, was not so much a self-evident fact of history as it was evidence—from particular and discrete moments in time—of someone’s, some group’s effort to identify and thereby mobilize a collectivity” (287). The kind of history that is constructed to follow a continuous, linear narrative is what Scott calls, a fantasy: Fantasy is the means by which real relations of identity between past and present and discovered and/or forged. Fantasy is more or less synonymous with imagination, and it is taken to be subject to rational, intentional control; one directs one’s imagination purposively to achieve a coherent aim, that of writing oneself and one’s group into history, writing the history of individuals or groups (Scott, 2001:287).

Authors: Yang, Fangchih.
first   previous   Page 3 of 25   next   last



background image
3
I. Fantasy Echo
From a poststructuralist point of view, identity does not have an essence, that is
to say that identity is not grounded in one’s anatomy or culture. All identities are
strategically linked to our bodies or culture so that we mistake this connection to our
bodies or culture as natural. Hence, “women” as an “identity category” is not rooted
in biology, but is constructed as such repeatedly. Similarly, feminist as an identity
category is also fabricated over and again by feminists, and the writing of feminist
history plays an important role in constructing this identity category. The history of
women’s movement enables feminists to identify with a shared past and hence,
motivates them to face a collective future together. However, Eric Hobsbawn
reminds us that traditions are invented, and the invented traditions are used to justify,
or mobilize certain political actions. Hence, any tradition should be seen as the
product of careful processes of selection.
However, feminist historians have largely ignored the intervention made by
Hobsbawn as they continue to write women’s histories of activism without reflecting
on their own inventions. And even for those who concur that collective identities are
invented for political purposes, they are slow in attending to the process of invention
(Scott, 2001: 286). As an intervention into feminist historiography, Scott criticizes
the notion of feminist history as continuous as is written by many feminist historians
and proposes that “feminist identity was an effect of a rhetorical political strategy
invoked differently by different feminists at different times” (2001:286). This is to
say that, the “history” of feminism cannot be explained through cause and effect, but
is “a story of discontinuity that was repeatedly sutured by feminist activists… into a
vision of uninterrupted linear succession” (286-287). “The identity of women, I
argue, was not so much a self-evident fact of history as it was evidence—from
particular and discrete moments in time—of someone’s, some group’s effort to
identify and thereby mobilize a collectivity” (287).
The kind of history that is constructed to follow a continuous, linear narrative is
what Scott calls, a fantasy:
Fantasy is the means by which real relations of identity between past and
present and discovered and/or forged. Fantasy is more or less synonymous
with imagination, and it is taken to be subject to rational, intentional control;
one directs one’s imagination purposively to achieve a coherent aim, that of
writing oneself and one’s group into history, writing the history of individuals
or groups (Scott, 2001:287).


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 3 of 25   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.