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Beautiful and Bad Women: Media Feminism and The Politics of Its Construction in Taiwan
Unformatted Document Text:  4 Using psychoanalysis, Scott discusses the three formal characteristic of fantasy 1. “Fantasy is the setting for desire” (288). To live in fantasy is to imagine, to participate, and to enact this fantasy. 2. Fantasy not only reproduces but also masks conflicts and divisions in a society. The desire to fantasize is created through the designation of a reviled other—an other who deprives you of happiness. Hence, fantasy is sustained through an other while at the same time also masks that other by appearing to be a whole, to be in a state of happiness. 3. “Fantasy operates as narrative” which rearranges contradictory, incoherent elements diachronically, making them into causes and effects. Fantasy “extracts coherence from confusion, reduces multiplicity into singularity, and reconciles illicit desire with the law” (289). These characteristics enable us to see history as a form of fantasy—“a fantasized narrative that imposes sequential order on otherwise chaotic and contingent occurrences” (290)—and to explore how that fantasy contributes to the articulation of political identity (287-290). Fantasy is usually expressed through an allochronistic discourse. Johannes Fabian points out that in ethnographic writings, Western anthropologists tend to see people from different places as the other and locate them onto a sequential temporal order. This is to say that, in Western thought, time has been conceptualized as linear; and in encountering people from the non-Western world, Western anthropologists construct a fantasy which places themselves at the end of the linear time, the modern, and allots non-Western people to the pre-modern, the barbaric. In doing this, they also justify their imperial expansion as fulfillment of their “civilizing mission”. In constructing the beautiful-and-bad woman as an identity category, popular media, especially women’s magazines, also rely on a linear conception of time and history. This popular historiographic discourse arranges multiple, chaotic, complex feminist events into a singular, successive feminist history. This popular feminist history is also grounded in a discourse of allochronism—feminist activism that does not fit into the need of women’s magazines is allocated to a different place (such as “Western” feminism) and time (such as tradition). This facilitates the fabrication of a unified, consistent feminist history as the identity base for the new beautiful-and-bad feminist. Echoes are reproductions of an original sound, but they are not complete, perfect reproductions. They are “delayed returns of sound,” and they usually “give back only the final fragments of a phrase.” When an echo mingles with the original sound, it alters the original sound, creating cacophony and multiplicity; hence, echoes undermine “the notion of enduring sameness that attaches to identity” (291). If fantasy is seen as the repetition of sameness and thus, the securing of identity by

Authors: Yang, Fangchih.
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4
Using psychoanalysis, Scott discusses the three formal characteristic of
fantasy 1. “Fantasy is the setting for desire” (288). To live in fantasy is to imagine, to
participate, and to enact this fantasy. 2. Fantasy not only reproduces but also masks
conflicts and divisions in a society. The desire to fantasize is created through the
designation of a reviled other—an other who deprives you of happiness. Hence,
fantasy is sustained through an other while at the same time also masks that other by
appearing to be a whole, to be in a state of happiness. 3. “Fantasy operates as
narrative” which rearranges contradictory, incoherent elements diachronically, making
them into causes and effects. Fantasy “extracts coherence from confusion, reduces
multiplicity into singularity, and reconciles illicit desire with the law” (289). These
characteristics enable us to see history as a form of fantasy—“a fantasized narrative
that imposes sequential order on otherwise chaotic and contingent occurrences”
(290)—and to explore how that fantasy contributes to the articulation of political
identity (287-290).
Fantasy is usually expressed through an allochronistic discourse. Johannes
Fabian points out that in ethnographic writings, Western anthropologists tend to see
people from different places as the other and locate them onto a sequential temporal
order. This is to say that, in Western thought, time has been conceptualized as linear;
and in encountering people from the non-Western world, Western anthropologists
construct a fantasy which places themselves at the end of the linear time, the modern,
and allots non-Western people to the pre-modern, the barbaric. In doing this, they
also justify their imperial expansion as fulfillment of their “civilizing mission”.
In constructing the beautiful-and-bad woman as an identity category,
popular media, especially women’s magazines, also rely on a linear conception of
time and history. This popular historiographic discourse arranges multiple, chaotic,
complex feminist events into a singular, successive feminist history. This popular
feminist history is also grounded in a discourse of allochronism—feminist activism
that does not fit into the need of women’s magazines is allocated to a different place
(such as “Western” feminism) and time (such as tradition). This facilitates the
fabrication of a unified, consistent feminist history as the identity base for the new
beautiful-and-bad feminist.
Echoes are reproductions of an original sound, but they are not complete, perfect
reproductions. They are “delayed returns of sound,” and they usually “give back only
the final fragments of a phrase.” When an echo mingles with the original sound, it
alters the original sound, creating cacophony and multiplicity; hence, echoes
undermine “the notion of enduring sameness that attaches to identity” (291). If
fantasy is seen as the repetition of sameness and thus, the securing of identity by


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