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Defining Viewer Typologies: Identifying Television Channel Repertoires in Multi-Channel Television Environments
Unformatted Document Text:  8 significantly to channel repertoire, as does how actively it is used. Ferguson and Perse further delineated channel repertoires through their categorizations of Total Channel Repertoire (TCR) and Mindful Channel Repertoire (MCR). “TCR is the number of channels that viewers remember watching if aided recall is used.” Conversely, they defined MCR as “the number of channels that viewers freely recall watching (i.e., unaided)” (Ferguson and Perse, 1992). For the purposes of this study, TCR will be our focus. James Webster and Lawrence Lichty (1991) concluded there were two primary determinants to influence audience behavior. First, structural determinants are media factors, such as number of available channels, audience availability and audience size. The second type of determinant is the individual determinant. This includes the needs, tastes, desires and preferences of individual audience members. These individual determinants relate directly to how the audience formulates a channel repertoire. This research relies primarily on individual determinants. It does this implementing a methodology used to measure individuals and then compare them. Once the individual determinants have been identified, a large-scale randomized study should follow to determine the extent to which individuals like those identified in this study exist within our society. Methodology An Overview As previously noted, this study will rely on William Stephenson’s Q methodology to obtain its results. Of the methodology Stephenson wrote, “The concern in Q-method is with a person’s ideas, attitudes, opinions, beliefs, as those are modeled by the individual as such” (Stephenson p. 11). “Fundamentally it is a method by which the individual can model for himself what his attitude of mind is about complicated topics, issues, or situations. Its primary concern therefore is with a person’s subjectivity as he describes it, not as we (psychologists or onlookers) infer it. All measurements in Q are central to the person – the scales, so to speak, are in the person’s own mind” (Stephenson p. 5). In its essence, Q methodology incorporates the differences in people to arrive in its conclusions. Although one should note that the use of the word conclusions with Q methodology is also somewhat ambiguous. When incorporating Q methodology into a study the researchers should realize that this methodology’s purpose is to explore questions, not answer them. In many ways a Q study is like a flashlight in a cave, it provides a manner to see, but the person looking has to determine what they witnessed. This is particularly true when the research includes entities as subjective as people. People exist on a continuum where they are simultaneously different yet also the same. Q method guides

Authors: Reber, Bryan. and Harriss, Chandler.
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significantly to channel repertoire, as does how actively it is used. Ferguson and Perse further delineated channel
repertoires through their categorizations of Total Channel Repertoire (TCR) and Mindful Channel Repertoire (MCR).
“TCR is the number of channels that viewers remember watching if aided recall is used.” Conversely, they defined
MCR as “the number of channels that viewers freely recall watching (i.e., unaided)” (Ferguson and Perse, 1992). For
the purposes of this study, TCR will be our focus.
James Webster and Lawrence Lichty (1991) concluded there were two primary determinants to influence
audience behavior. First, structural determinants are media factors, such as number of available channels, audience
availability and audience size. The second type of determinant is the individual determinant. This includes the needs,
tastes, desires and preferences of individual audience members. These individual determinants relate directly to how
the audience formulates a channel repertoire. This research relies primarily on individual determinants. It does this
implementing a methodology used to measure individuals and then compare them. Once the individual determinants
have been identified, a large-scale randomized study should follow to determine the extent to which individuals like
those identified in this study exist within our society.
Methodology
An Overview
As previously noted, this study will rely on William Stephenson’s Q methodology to obtain its results. Of the
methodology Stephenson wrote, “The concern in Q-method is with a person’s ideas, attitudes, opinions, beliefs, as
those are modeled by the individual as such” (Stephenson p. 11). “Fundamentally it is a method by which the
individual can model for himself what his attitude of mind is about complicated topics, issues, or situations. Its primary
concern therefore is with a person’s subjectivity as he describes it, not as we (psychologists or onlookers) infer it. All
measurements in Q are central to the person – the scales, so to speak, are in the person’s own mind” (Stephenson p. 5).
In its essence, Q methodology incorporates the differences in people to arrive in its conclusions. Although one should
note that the use of the word conclusions with Q methodology is also somewhat ambiguous. When incorporating Q
methodology into a study the researchers should realize that this methodology’s purpose is to explore questions, not
answer them. In many ways a Q study is like a flashlight in a cave, it provides a manner to see, but the person looking
has to determine what they witnessed. This is particularly true when the research includes entities as subjective as
people. People exist on a continuum where they are simultaneously different yet also the same. Q method guides


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