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Defining Viewer Typologies: Identifying Television Channel Repertoires in Multi-Channel Television Environments
Unformatted Document Text:  9 researchers to pinpoint those differences and similarities. It is a form a factor analysis that factors across individuals instead of variables. Concerning Q methodology Barbosa et al. (1974) wrote, “Q methodology is a hybrid of qualitative and quantitative principles used to analyze subjective data and group individuals according to their resources.” Timothy Stephen (1985) noted, Q methodology may be useful to those interested in constructing relatively objective maps of subjective experience or to those investigating connectedness within social groups.” This is exactly the goal of this study – to measure some elements of connectedness within television viewers. Samples and Sorts Q methodology incorporates the usage of two different samples – the P and Q samples. The P (person) sample is what is normally considered the sample in quantitative research. It is comprised of the individuals who participate in the study. The selection of respondents for this study was directed by gender, age and education as follows: Gender: (a) Male (b) Female Age: (a) 18-25 (b) 26-39 (c) 40-54 (d) 55 and over Attended College: (a) Yes (b) No The P sample was then replicated which created a total factorial size of 2x4x2x2 or a total of 32 respondents. These respondents were drawn from two southeastern cities. The respondents were chosen to represent a variety of backgrounds and demographic categories. The only filter used in this process was that respondents were required to subscribe to a multi-channel television service. In regard to the small number of respondents, Stephenson (1953) wrote: “We do not mean by this that it is unnecessary to study to other cases. Nor are we to outline a new principle of inductive inference which permits us to infer from ‘one to all.’ When the physicist theorizes about a particular metal, any piece of it will serve his experimental purposes. Likewise, for us, theories are matters of general import, the concern of general psychology, and applicable to any person in principle. Nothing will be contributed by any use of ‘large numbers’ of persons as such, for any purposes of statistical inference” (Stephenson p. 3). With this statement, Stephenson illustrates that users of this methodology are not particularly concerned with the generalizability of the sample of respondents, but rather are more concerned with reproduction and generalizability of mindsets. Once the factors have been defined, determining the extent of their existence in a society is merely a matter of counting. What Q method attempts to do use is direct researchers to what is worthy of counting and possibly how it should be counted.

Authors: Reber, Bryan. and Harriss, Chandler.
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9
researchers to pinpoint those differences and similarities. It is a form a factor analysis that factors across individuals
instead of variables.
Concerning Q methodology Barbosa et al. (1974) wrote, “Q methodology is a hybrid of qualitative and
quantitative principles used to analyze subjective data and group individuals according to their resources.” Timothy
Stephen (1985) noted, Q methodology may be useful to those interested in constructing relatively objective maps of
subjective experience or to those investigating connectedness within social groups.” This is exactly the goal of this
study – to measure some elements of connectedness within television viewers.
Samples and Sorts
Q methodology incorporates the usage of two different samples – the P and Q samples. The P (person) sample is
what is normally considered the sample in quantitative research. It is comprised of the individuals who participate in
the study. The selection of respondents for this study was directed by gender, age and education as follows:
Gender: (a) Male (b) Female
Age: (a) 18-25 (b) 26-39 (c) 40-54 (d) 55 and over
Attended College: (a) Yes (b) No
The P sample was then replicated which created a total factorial size of 2x4x2x2 or a total of 32 respondents. These
respondents were drawn from two southeastern cities. The respondents were chosen to represent a variety of
backgrounds and demographic categories. The only filter used in this process was that respondents were required to
subscribe to a multi-channel television service. In regard to the small number of respondents, Stephenson (1953)
wrote: “We do not mean by this that it is unnecessary to study to other cases. Nor are we to outline a new principle of
inductive inference which permits us to infer from ‘one to all.’ When the physicist theorizes about a particular metal,
any piece of it will serve his experimental purposes. Likewise, for us, theories are matters of general import, the
concern of general psychology, and applicable to any person in principle. Nothing will be contributed by any use of
‘large numbers’ of persons as such, for any purposes of statistical inference” (Stephenson p. 3). With this statement,
Stephenson illustrates that users of this methodology are not particularly concerned with the generalizability of the
sample of respondents, but rather are more concerned with reproduction and generalizability of mindsets. Once the
factors have been defined, determining the extent of their existence in a society is merely a matter of counting. What Q
method attempts to do use is direct researchers to what is worthy of counting and possibly how it should be counted.


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