All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Response Patterns in Computer-Administered Surveys
Unformatted Document Text:  Computer Administered Surveys 17 to a person they had no prior knowledge of. This finding is very disturbing in that, if this finding is extrapolated outward to the general population, an overwhelming percentage of Internet users blithely provide personal information at the drop of a hat. As Prabhaker (2001) noted, the slightest incentive is all that some Internet users need to share any amount of personal information. Despite the fact that nothing untoward was intended by the collection of participants’ e-mail addresses – and despite the fact that these e-mail addresses were not actually collected, as it was unnecessary for the completion of this study – the willingness of participants to give personal information out this freely is not comforting. There is an alternative explanation to this phenomenon, though. So much spam (an acronym for “self-propelled advertising material,” which refers to the waves of advertisements that bombard many e-mailboxes) arrives daily for the perusal of the average Internet user that the personal e-mail address may no longer be considered “personal information.” While most e-mail providers require personal information to set up an e-mail account, an e-mail address alone cannot provide the key to a user’s entire life in the way that a social security number can. In addition, Internet users can easily create multiple e-mail addresses using fictitious personal information, thereby avoiding the issue altogether. Further investigation into this phenomenon can clarify which trend is true: the ease with which Internet users provide their personal information, or the thought that personal e-mail addresses are no longer considered personal information. Hypothesis 3, which tested participants’ behaviors and attitudes toward privacy policies, was supported as well. Of the 78 participants in the Hypothesis 3 Group, 93.6% of them chose not to read the privacy policy provided at the beginning of their experimental condition (Experimental Condition 4). Standing alone, the support of Hypothesis 3 only

Authors: Roseman, Joshua. and Mitrook, Michael.
first   previous   Page 18 of 25   next   last



background image
Computer Administered Surveys
17
to a person they had no prior knowledge of. This finding is very disturbing in that, if this
finding is extrapolated outward to the general population, an overwhelming percentage of
Internet users blithely provide personal information at the drop of a hat. As Prabhaker (2001)
noted, the slightest incentive is all that some Internet users need to share any amount of
personal information. Despite the fact that nothing untoward was intended by the collection
of participants’ e-mail addresses – and despite the fact that these e-mail addresses were not
actually collected, as it was unnecessary for the completion of this study – the willingness of
participants to give personal information out this freely is not comforting.
There is an alternative explanation to this phenomenon, though. So much spam (an
acronym for “self-propelled advertising material,” which refers to the waves of
advertisements that bombard many e-mailboxes) arrives daily for the perusal of the average
Internet user that the personal e-mail address may no longer be considered “personal
information.” While most e-mail providers require personal information to set up an e-mail
account, an e-mail address alone cannot provide the key to a user’s entire life in the way that a
social security number can. In addition, Internet users can easily create multiple e-mail
addresses using fictitious personal information, thereby avoiding the issue altogether. Further
investigation into this phenomenon can clarify which trend is true: the ease with which
Internet users provide their personal information, or the thought that personal e-mail addresses
are no longer considered personal information.
Hypothesis 3, which tested participants’ behaviors and attitudes toward privacy
policies, was supported as well. Of the 78 participants in the Hypothesis 3 Group, 93.6% of
them chose not to read the privacy policy provided at the beginning of their experimental
condition (Experimental Condition 4). Standing alone, the support of Hypothesis 3 only


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 18 of 25   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.