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Response Patterns in Computer-Administered Surveys
Unformatted Document Text:  Computer Administered Surveys 3 research issue is the “sampling procedures that must be taken into consideration when conducting a network survey” (p.205). Beyond that, If the researcher can identify a population for which everyone has a known and valid e-mail address, and the researcher has access to those addresses, then a true random sample can be drawn… If researchers obtain a high response rate (e.g., 60% or better) from this random sample, then the research results can be generalized to the overall population (p.205). Best, Krueger, Hubbard, and Smith (2001) take issue with the generalizability of Internet surveys, citing the preponderance of Internet users being younger, wealthier, more highly educated, and more likely to be married than the populace at large. They drew a convenient Internet sample and a probabilistic telephone sample for comparison purposes, and found that “Internet samples may be useful for investigating how individuals generate certain types of attitudes” (p.143). However, their concerns still remain in the area of sample diversity. Fisher and Margolis (1996), as well as Schonland and Williams (1996) also discovered a problem with participant diversity – finding a male response bias. Social Desirability and Internet Research Most research examining the Internet tends to be applied qualitative or applied quantitative research; that is, it either provides a specific situation and gathers data from users on what their actions or opinions are in that situation or is simply ethnographic or naturalistic research. Because it is applied, a theoretical basis is rarely presented. However, in order to most accurately and adequately complete experimental research, a theoretical basis is important to any study.

Authors: Roseman, Joshua. and Mitrook, Michael.
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Computer Administered Surveys
3
research issue is the “sampling procedures that must be taken into consideration when
conducting a network survey” (p.205). Beyond that,
If the researcher can identify a population for which everyone has a known and
valid e-mail address, and the researcher has access to those addresses, then a
true random sample can be drawn… If researchers obtain a high response rate
(e.g., 60% or better) from this random sample, then the research results can be
generalized to the overall population (p.205).
Best, Krueger, Hubbard, and Smith (2001) take issue with the generalizability of
Internet surveys, citing the preponderance of Internet users being younger, wealthier, more
highly educated, and more likely to be married than the populace at large. They drew a
convenient Internet sample and a probabilistic telephone sample for comparison purposes, and
found that “Internet samples may be useful for investigating how individuals generate certain
types of attitudes” (p.143). However, their concerns still remain in the area of sample
diversity. Fisher and Margolis (1996), as well as Schonland and Williams (1996) also
discovered a problem with participant diversity – finding a male response bias.
Social Desirability and Internet Research
Most research examining the Internet tends to be applied qualitative or applied
quantitative research; that is, it either provides a specific situation and gathers data from users
on what their actions or opinions are in that situation or is simply ethnographic or naturalistic
research. Because it is applied, a theoretical basis is rarely presented. However, in order to
most accurately and adequately complete experimental research, a theoretical basis is
important to any study.


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