All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Response Patterns in Computer-Administered Surveys
Unformatted Document Text:  Computer Administered Surveys 5 While not couched in the social desirability framework, Perkins and Yuan (2001) suggest research participants might feel more comfortable answering questions posed by their computers, as opposed to those posed by researchers in a face-to-face manner. Their results contained very minor differences in means, but they also state that these differences were significant, and indicate that methodology, not instrumentation or demographics, might actually cause differences in response. A word on the Crowne-Marlowe scale: the scale is not used in this study because the topics addressed in the Crowne-Marlowe scale are not relevant to the topics addressed in the survey from which this study’s results were drawn. Adding the Crowne-Marlowe scale to this study would have undermined the trust built in the cover letter of the study. Internet Privacy The term “Internet privacy” is bandied about like it is the next big thing since the invention of Windows (the computer equivalent of sliced bread). For this study, “Internet privacy” is operationalized as the resistance to any efforts from third parties over the Internet to obtain personal information, regardless of the purpose. A corollary to this operational definition comes from Klein (2001), who suggests that Internet privacy issues are actually questions of confidentiality, although privacy is the more commonly used term; therefore, “Internet privacy” is the term used in this study. One of the major issues regarding Internet privacy is that consumer profiling goes on virtually all the time, usually without the knowledge of the person being profiled. Despite privacy concerns, however, Internet users put themselves in a difficult position simply by getting on the Internet; it is virtually impossible to even sign up for Internet service without providing at least some personal information (Tynan, 2000), and even creating a simple

Authors: Roseman, Joshua. and Mitrook, Michael.
first   previous   Page 6 of 25   next   last



background image
Computer Administered Surveys
5
While not couched in the social desirability framework, Perkins and Yuan (2001)
suggest research participants might feel more comfortable answering questions posed by their
computers, as opposed to those posed by researchers in a face-to-face manner. Their results
contained very minor differences in means, but they also state that these differences were
significant, and indicate that methodology, not instrumentation or demographics, might
actually cause differences in response.
A word on the Crowne-Marlowe scale: the scale is not used in this study because the
topics addressed in the Crowne-Marlowe scale are not relevant to the topics addressed in the
survey from which this study’s results were drawn. Adding the Crowne-Marlowe scale to this
study would have undermined the trust built in the cover letter of the study.
Internet Privacy
The term “Internet privacy” is bandied about like it is the next big thing since the
invention of Windows (the computer equivalent of sliced bread). For this study, “Internet
privacy” is operationalized as the resistance to any efforts from third parties over the Internet
to obtain personal information, regardless of the purpose. A corollary to this operational
definition comes from Klein (2001), who suggests that Internet privacy issues are actually
questions of confidentiality, although privacy is the more commonly used term; therefore,
“Internet privacy” is the term used in this study.
One of the major issues regarding Internet privacy is that consumer profiling goes on
virtually all the time, usually without the knowledge of the person being profiled. Despite
privacy concerns, however, Internet users put themselves in a difficult position simply by
getting on the Internet; it is virtually impossible to even sign up for Internet service without
providing at least some personal information (Tynan, 2000), and even creating a simple


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 6 of 25   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.