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A cross-cultural comparison of the relationship between ICA, ICMS and assertiveness/cooperativeness tendencies
Unformatted Document Text:  Cross-cultural ICA, ICMS and Assertiveness/Cooperativeness 13 cultures prefer passive, collaborative, and avoiding styles in managing conflicts (Haar and Krahe 1999; Itoi, Ohbuchi, and Fukuno 1996; Ohbuchi and Takahashi 1994; Ohbuchi, Fukushima, and Tedeschi 1999; Trubisky, Ting-Toomey, and Lin1991). Cultural researchers have attempted to explain the differences in cross-cultural conflict management styles According to Triandis (1994, 1995), while people from individualistic and low context cultures tend to consider that interactions within relationships and groups occur between independent individuals, and thus disagreements and conflicts are undeniable and inevitable aspects of social life, in collectivistic and high context cultures people tend to dislike social disorganization or disagreements. As Tinsley (1998) argued, cultural biases may exacerbate the potential for mishandling conflicts and disagreements. Therefore, people from different cultures may hold different preferences regarding how conflict should be managed and resolved. Researcher believes that understanding cultural differences in conflict management can help us avoid the secondary problems, derived from mishandling conflicts. Participants and Procedures Participants of this study were a total of 316 (164 males and 152 females) undergraduate (218) and graduate (98) students enrolled in two midwestern universities. Of 316 participants, 158 participants were Korean international students and the other 158 were domestic (U.S.) students. Participation was voluntary and confidential. Upon agreeing to participate in the study, each participant received a pack of questionnaire containing Neuliep and McCroskey’s (1997) Personal Report of Intercultural Communication Apprehension (PRICA) to estimate individuals’ level of ICA and Wilmot and Hocker’s (2001) Interpersonal Conflict Management Style (ICMS)

Authors: Hong, Jongbae.
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Cross-cultural ICA, ICMS and Assertiveness/Cooperativeness
13
cultures prefer passive, collaborative, and avoiding styles in managing conflicts (Haar
and Krahe 1999; Itoi, Ohbuchi, and Fukuno 1996; Ohbuchi and Takahashi 1994;
Ohbuchi, Fukushima, and Tedeschi 1999; Trubisky, Ting-Toomey, and Lin1991).
Cultural researchers have attempted to explain the differences in cross-cultural conflict
management styles According to Triandis (1994, 1995), while people from individualistic
and low context cultures tend to consider that interactions within relationships and groups
occur between independent individuals, and thus disagreements and conflicts are
undeniable and inevitable aspects of social life, in collectivistic and high context cultures
people tend to dislike social disorganization or disagreements. As Tinsley (1998) argued,
cultural biases may exacerbate the potential for mishandling conflicts and disagreements.
Therefore, people from different cultures may hold different preferences regarding how
conflict should be managed and resolved. Researcher believes that understanding cultural
differences in conflict management can help us avoid the secondary problems, derived
from mishandling conflicts.
Participants and Procedures
Participants of this study were a total of 316 (164 males and 152 females)
undergraduate (218) and graduate (98) students enrolled in two midwestern universities.
Of 316 participants, 158 participants were Korean international students and the other
158 were domestic (U.S.) students. Participation was voluntary and confidential.
Upon agreeing to participate in the study, each participant received a pack of
questionnaire containing Neuliep and McCroskey’s (1997) Personal Report of
Intercultural Communication Apprehension (PRICA) to estimate individuals’ level of
ICA and Wilmot and Hocker’s (2001) Interpersonal Conflict Management Style (ICMS)


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