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A cross-cultural comparison of the relationship between ICA, ICMS and assertiveness/cooperativeness tendencies
Unformatted Document Text:  Cross-cultural ICA, ICMS and Assertiveness/Cooperativeness 17 RQ2: What are the differences and similarities in the relationship of intercultural communication apprehension with intercultural conflict management style styles and assertiveness/cooperativeness tendencies between U.S. and Korean students? RQ3: To what extent does ICA influences ICMS and styles and assertiveness/ cooperativeness tendencies for U.S. and Korean students respectively? RQ4: What are the differences and similarities in intercultural conflict management styles and assertiveness/cooperativeness tendencies according to the level of intercultural communication apprehension between U.S. and Korean students? Results Table 1 shows the relationship between ICA, ICMS, assertiveness/ cooperativeness tendencies for U.S. students. First, there were a negative correlation between ICA and avoidance style (r=-.38, p<.01) and a positive correlation between ICA and assertiveness (r=.22, p<.01) and between ICA and cooperativeness (r=.20, p<.05). Because higher scores in ICA indicate lower levels of ICA, above three significant correlations with ICA were interpreted in reverse. That is, the U.S. students with high ICA tended to avoid intercultural conflicts less frequently than did those with low ICA, and they tended to be less assertive and simultaneously less cooperative than did those with low ICA. Second, there were positive correlations between avoidance and compromise (r=.21, p<.01) styles and between avoidance and accommodation (r=.52, p<.01) styles, but considerably negative correlations were found between avoidance style and assertiveness (r=-.82, p<.01) and between avoidance style and cooperativeness (r= -.25, p<.01). That is, the U.S. students who avoided intercultural conflicts frequently tended to use compromise and accommodation styles often, and they were less assertive

Authors: Hong, Jongbae.
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Cross-cultural ICA, ICMS and Assertiveness/Cooperativeness
17
RQ2: What are the differences and similarities in the relationship of intercultural
communication apprehension with intercultural conflict management style styles
and assertiveness/cooperativeness tendencies between U.S. and Korean students?
RQ3: To what extent does ICA influences ICMS and styles and assertiveness/
cooperativeness tendencies for U.S. and Korean students respectively?
RQ4: What are the differences and similarities in intercultural conflict management
styles and assertiveness/cooperativeness tendencies according to the level of
intercultural communication apprehension between U.S. and Korean students?
Results
Table 1 shows the relationship between ICA, ICMS, assertiveness/
cooperativeness tendencies for U.S. students. First, there were a negative correlation
between ICA and avoidance style (r=-.38, p<.01) and a positive correlation between ICA
and assertiveness (r=.22, p<.01) and between ICA and cooperativeness (r=.20, p<.05).
Because higher scores in ICA indicate lower levels of ICA, above three significant
correlations with ICA were interpreted in reverse. That is, the U.S. students with high
ICA tended to avoid intercultural conflicts less frequently than did those with low ICA,
and they tended to be less assertive and simultaneously less cooperative than did those
with low ICA. Second, there were positive correlations between avoidance and
compromise (r=.21, p<.01) styles and between avoidance and accommodation (r=.52,
p<.01) styles, but considerably negative correlations were found between avoidance style
and assertiveness (r=-.82, p<.01) and between avoidance style and cooperativeness (r=
-.25, p<.01). That is, the U.S. students who avoided intercultural conflicts frequently
tended to use compromise and accommodation styles often, and they were less assertive


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