All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

A content analysis of news coverage of skin cancer prevention and detection, 1979-2002
Unformatted Document Text:  Skin cancer news coverage 8 clothing, 27% were very likely to seek shade, and 30% were very likely to use sunscreen (Santmyire, Feldman, & Fleischer, 2001) . Additionally, only 21% of adults had ever had a skin cancer examination (Santmyire et al., 2001) . The purpose of our study was to conduct a formative descriptive analysis of skin cancer news coverage, and to understand the context within which primary and secondary skin cancer prevention were discussed. While news coverage of other cancer types, particularly breast cancer, has been studied extensively (Andsager & Powers, 2001; Wells, Marshall, Crawley, & Dickersin, 2001; Yanovitzky & Blitz, 2000; Andsager, Hust, & Powers, 2000; Corbett & Mori, 1999; Clarke, 1999; Marino & Gerlach, 1999; Moyer et al., 1995; Stoddard et al., 1990) , there are no known studies addressing news coverage of skin cancer. Once this basic foundation is presented, we can speculate about the implications of such news coverage. Methods Content analysis is utilized when the desired basis of inference is the content of communication (Holsti, 1968). Some characteristics of research conducted through this methodology include the following: 1) it must be objective; 2) it must be systematic; 3) it must have some generality (Holsti, 1968). Through content analysis, inferences can be made about systems, standards, indices and symptoms, linguistic representations, communications, and institutional processes (Krippendorf, 1980). While descriptions of media content can be a primary goal of research, content analysis can also be used in conjunction with other research strategies to establish media effects (Riffe, Lacy, & Fico, 198). While we make no attempt to establish effects of skin cancer news coverage here, we hope to conduct such research in the future.

Authors: Stryker, Jo. and Solky, Benjamin.
first   previous   Page 8 of 26   next   last



background image
Skin cancer news coverage
8
clothing, 27% were very likely to seek shade, and 30% were very likely to use sunscreen
(Santmyire, Feldman, & Fleischer, 2001)
. Additionally, only 21% of adults had ever had a
skin cancer examination
(Santmyire et al., 2001)
.
The purpose of our study was to conduct a formative descriptive analysis of skin cancer
news coverage, and to understand the context within which primary and secondary skin cancer
prevention were discussed. While news coverage of other cancer types, particularly breast
cancer, has been studied extensively
(Andsager & Powers, 2001; Wells, Marshall, Crawley,
& Dickersin, 2001; Yanovitzky & Blitz, 2000; Andsager, Hust, & Powers, 2000; Corbett &
Mori, 1999; Clarke, 1999; Marino & Gerlach, 1999; Moyer et al., 1995; Stoddard et al.,
1990)
, there are no known studies addressing news coverage of skin cancer. Once this basic
foundation is presented, we can speculate about the implications of such news coverage.
Methods
Content analysis is utilized when the desired basis of inference is the content of
communication (Holsti, 1968). Some characteristics of research conducted through this
methodology include the following: 1) it must be objective; 2) it must be systematic; 3) it must
have some generality (Holsti, 1968). Through content analysis, inferences can be made about
systems, standards, indices and symptoms, linguistic representations, communications, and
institutional processes (Krippendorf, 1980). While descriptions of media content can be a
primary goal of research, content analysis can also be used in conjunction with other research
strategies to establish media effects (Riffe, Lacy, & Fico, 198). While we make no attempt to
establish effects of skin cancer news coverage here, we hope to conduct such research in the
future.


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 8 of 26   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.