All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

e-Privacy Research: a New Disciplinary Borderland.
Unformatted Document Text:  * 13 3.5. Are cookies been used? As announced in the introduction to this research, we have analysed one way of implicit datacollection. In our first analysis 51% of the websites used cookies. This has increased to 67% in 2002. The sender of a cookie is in 73% of the cases the server of the visited website itself (76% in 2001). 12% of the cookies are sent by one or more thirds, such as online marketing businesses (16% in 2001). In 11% of the cases the cookies are sent by the website and by outside companies (7% in 2001). Are they session-cookies that disappear after the visit to a website or are they permanent cookies that can be repeatedly recalled and altered at each session? One third of the cookies (34%) are session-cookies. They are only active during the visit of a website and disappear when the visit is finished. A status quo of 66% of the cookies can be recalled at future visits (even very often until a remote date somewhere in 2030). If a visitor sets his browser up in a way that cookies are not automatically accepted, but that a warning pops up first, will the visitor receive access to the website if the cookies are rejected? In 22% of the cases where cookies have been rejected, access to the site is granted without any problems (33% in 2001). In 68% of the websites the cookies appear repeatedly, and disturb the surfing (55% in 2001). Although access to the site is granted, the cookies, that the user can accept or reject, reappear again and again. In 10% of the cases no access to the site is granted if cookies are not accepted on the homepage (11% in 2001). Sometimes a webpage appears suggesting to accept the cookies. Exceptionally reasons are given why cookies are necessary to visit the website. In 12% (status quo in 2002) of the cases the visitor is informed about the use of cookies in the privacy statement or in a separate page where legal aspects or general conditions are explained. Among them 6% only mention in the privacy statement what a cookie is. 34% go further and explains what will be the use of those cookies. 28% give information about cookies, their purpose and how to switch them off. 31% give yet complementary information. But 88% of the websites using cookies do not give any information about the goal and use of cookies. 3.6. The e-mail response test The e-mail address in some privacy statements incited us to verify to what degree a company can answer a simple question about the privacy policy. We have sent a question by e-mail 2 not only where a privacy policy was present. On each website asking for personal data we have addressed a simple request concerning the goals whereto these data will be used. On a request 57% did not answer in our mystery e-mail campaign in 2001 and 51% in 2002 (even by sites guarantying a response within 24 hours). The sites, that answered, needed a few minutes or replied up to ten days later. Among them who answered, 78% replied within 24 hours. What was the quality of the answer, has the question been answered specifically and personally? 63% replied to the question in a specific, informative and personal way (65% in 2001). 21% give a standardised answer, sometimes via an auto-responder (15% in 2001). 11% thanks the consumer for the request, but does not give an answer to the question (17% in 2001). In a few cases we received an 'out of office'-response, where the employee responsible for

Authors: Walrave, Michel.
first   previous   Page 13 of 19   next   last



background image
*
13
3.5. Are cookies been used?

As announced in the introduction to this research, we have analysed one way of
implicit datacollection. In our first analysis 51% of the websites used cookies.
This has increased to 67% in 2002. The sender of a cookie is in 73% of the cases
the server of the visited website itself (76% in 2001). 12% of the cookies are
sent by one or more thirds, such as online marketing businesses (16% in 2001).
In 11% of the cases the cookies are sent by the website and by outside
companies (7% in 2001).
Are they session-cookies that disappear after the visit to a website or are they
permanent cookies that can be repeatedly recalled and altered at each session?
One third of the cookies (34%) are session-cookies. They are only active during
the visit of a website and disappear when the visit is finished. A status quo of
66% of the cookies can be recalled at future visits (even very often until a
remote date somewhere in 2030).
If a visitor sets his browser up in a way that cookies are not automatically
accepted, but that a warning pops up first, will the visitor receive access to the
website if the cookies are rejected? In 22% of the cases where cookies have
been rejected, access to the site is granted without any problems (33% in 2001).
In 68% of the websites the cookies appear repeatedly, and disturb the surfing
(55% in 2001). Although access to the site is granted, the cookies, that the user
can accept or reject, reappear again and again. In 10% of the cases no access to
the site is granted if cookies are not accepted on the homepage (11% in 2001).
Sometimes a webpage appears suggesting to accept the cookies.
Exceptionally reasons are given why cookies are necessary to visit the website.
In 12% (status quo in 2002) of the cases the visitor is informed about the use of
cookies in the privacy statement or in a separate page where legal aspects or
general conditions are explained. Among them 6% only mention in the privacy
statement what a cookie is. 34% go further and explains what will be the use of
those cookies. 28% give information about cookies, their purpose and how to
switch them off. 31% give yet complementary information. But 88% of the
websites using cookies do not give any information about the goal and use of
cookies.

3.6. The e-mail response test
The e-mail address in some privacy statements incited us to verify to what
degree a company can answer a simple question about the privacy policy. We
have sent a question by e-mail
2
not only where a privacy policy was present. On
each website asking for personal data we have addressed a simple request
concerning the goals whereto these data will be used.
On a request 57% did not answer in our mystery e-mail campaign in 2001 and
51% in 2002 (even by sites guarantying a response within 24 hours). The sites,
that answered, needed a few minutes or replied up to ten days later. Among
them who answered, 78% replied within 24 hours.
What was the quality of the answer, has the question been answered specifically
and personally? 63% replied to the question in a specific, informative and
personal way (65% in 2001). 21% give a standardised answer, sometimes via an
auto-responder (15% in 2001). 11% thanks the consumer for the request, but
does not give an answer to the question (17% in 2001). In a few cases we
received an 'out of office'-response, where the employee responsible for


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 13 of 19   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.