All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

e-Privacy Research: a New Disciplinary Borderland.
Unformatted Document Text:  * 8 Sometimes, this word and hyperlink (“policy”, “disclaimer”, “conditions”, “site policy”) is reproduced in very small font or sometimes a colour that is difficult to remark on the background (f.e. light grey on a white background). In addition, the visitor has to scroll all the way down the webpage to find the link to that information. Sometimes a visitor has to click through several levels of the site before finding information about the privacy policy. It is also remarkable that some multinationals with a website in the .be-domain, have a link with a privacy statement in English, that complies with some Fair Information Practices (principles of self-regulation concerning the use of personal data), but not with European or Belgian legislation. Also the use of English terms such as “legal disclaimer” is not really consumers friendly in a website aimed at Belgian consumers. Words as “privacy” or “your rights”, in English and, if needed translated in one or several of the national languages can be more informative. A privacy statement should be, strictly speaking, easy to find on a website. But above all, this information must absolutely be accessible on a webpage where an electronic form is inserted (eventually through a hyperlink or a pop-up window). Before a website visitor entrusts information, the internet user must have the possibility to read the privacy statement. 3.3. Is the privacy statement complete? 3.3.1. Identification of the responsable A step further is the analysis of the contents of a privacy statement and the answer to the questions: does it correspond to the legal obligations? Do some firms go further than their legal obligations? How do the privacy statements score concerning clarity and completeness? The answers allow us to judge the quality of the privacy statements. Before all, the responsible person for the dataprocessing must be named. In short, website visitors, who will release their personal data, have to know to whom those data will be entrusted. 74% of the websites gathering data identify the responsible for the processing (45% in 2001). But, how detailed is that information in the privacy statement: 90% mention the name of the organisation, 23% have even a specific responsible department, 4% only name a person who can be contacted without giving more information about his or her function. No privacy statement mentions clearly a “privacy officer” or “dataprotection officer”, an employee answering the specific questions about the privacy policy (and other consumer's right) and responsible for checking and updating the privacy policy of the company. The privacy law defines that a responsible for processing has to mention also his address. 65% do it. 10% mention a telephone number in the privacy statement. 19% an e-mail address, which should make it easy to the visitor to contact the responsible with possible questions. 8% communicate several contact data. 3.3.2. Information about the goals of the data processing. Besides the identification of the responsible the consumer who gives data has to be informed about the goals of the processing. 88% of the websites having a privacy statement, mention the goals of the processing (85% in 2001). So, 15% of the privacy statements in 2001 and 12% in 2002 do not contain that essential information. But we have to stress that we cannot give an opinion over the completeness and the quality of this information. Namely we can’t verify in this

Authors: Walrave, Michel.
first   previous   Page 8 of 19   next   last



background image
*
8
Sometimes, this word and hyperlink (“policy”, “disclaimer”, “conditions”, “site
policy”) is reproduced in very small font or sometimes a colour that is difficult to
remark on the background (f.e. light grey on a white background). In addition,
the visitor has to scroll all the way down the webpage to find the link to that
information. Sometimes a visitor has to click through several levels of the site
before finding information about the privacy policy. It is also remarkable that
some multinationals with a website in the .be-domain, have a link with a privacy
statement in English, that complies with some Fair Information Practices
(principles of self-regulation concerning the use of personal data), but not with
European or Belgian legislation. Also the use of English terms such as “legal
disclaimer” is not really consumers friendly in a website aimed at Belgian
consumers. Words as “privacy” or “your rights”, in English and, if needed
translated in one or several of the national languages can be more informative. A
privacy statement should be, strictly speaking, easy to find on a website. But
above all, this information must absolutely be accessible on a webpage where an
electronic form is inserted (eventually through a hyperlink or a pop-up window).
Before a website visitor entrusts information, the internet user must have the
possibility to read the privacy statement.

3.3. Is the privacy statement complete?
3.3.1. Identification of the responsable
A step further is the analysis of the contents of a privacy statement and the
answer to the questions: does it correspond to the legal obligations? Do some
firms go further than their legal obligations? How do the privacy statements
score concerning clarity and completeness? The answers allow us to judge the
quality of the privacy statements.
Before all, the responsible person for the dataprocessing must be named. In
short, website visitors, who will release their personal data, have to know to
whom those data will be entrusted. 74% of the websites gathering data identify
the responsible for the processing (45% in 2001). But, how detailed is that
information in the privacy statement: 90% mention the name of the
organisation, 23% have even a specific responsible department, 4% only name a
person who can be contacted without giving more information about his or her
function. No privacy statement mentions clearly a “privacy officer” or
“dataprotection officer”, an employee answering the specific questions about the
privacy policy (and other consumer's right) and responsible for checking and
updating the privacy policy of the company.
The privacy law defines that a responsible for processing has to mention also his
address. 65% do it. 10% mention a telephone number in the privacy statement.
19% an e-mail address, which should make it easy to the visitor to contact the
responsible with possible questions. 8% communicate several contact data.

3.3.2. Information about the goals of the data processing.
Besides the identification of the responsible the consumer who gives data has to
be informed about the goals of the processing. 88% of the websites having a
privacy statement, mention the goals of the processing (85% in 2001). So, 15%
of the privacy statements in 2001 and 12% in 2002 do not contain that essential
information. But we have to stress that we cannot give an opinion over the
completeness and the quality of this information. Namely we can’t verify in this


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 8 of 19   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.