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Frontier Compliance: A Communication System Emerging in Cyberspace
Unformatted Document Text:  6 horsemen and plainsmen, and of defenders of society combating outlaws. To oppose an outlaw, people had to rely on even more violence, by the man whose gun would be used in defense of society (Rosa, 1969, p. 54). In the hands of an expert gunfighter, it was a highly persuasive instrument of law and order (Rosa, 1969, p. 28). As revealed in different perceptions and attitudes toward gunfighters ranging from hatred to hero- worship (Rosa, 1969, p. 11), the gun was the instrument of both lawmaker and lawbreaker (Rosa, 1969, p. 5). The gun presented a different sense of equality as whoever with skills with the gun had many things in their favor. “God created man, but it was Sam Colt’s revolver that made him equal” was the proverb of the frontier (Lewis, 1996, p. 257). However, for most people without such a skill, the gun was an instrument of “fear” that forced them to comply against their will, whether it was used by the lawmen or the outlaws. Big ranchers and farmers hired these gunmen to kill homesteaders and protect their properties (Lewis, 1996, p. 251). Money and skills in gunfighting were two important elements of power and compliance in the West. Thus the frontier was “lawless” in terms of the absence and lack of formal laws and enforcement as required by older social conditions, but operated under the guidance of its own code and social order that was developed under the special circumstances of the West. In this frontier situation, the westerner was responding to the demands of the moment, while the easterner abided by formal convention (Rosa, 1969, p. 25). Lawlessness as the Code in Cyberspace Cyberspace is a frontier for many people living in real space. It is a new, promised, and seemingly unlimited space, to which they are willing to enter and look for new activities, new experiences, and new ownership. Conflicts and disputes are bound to occur in this untamed space, and a significant amount of disputes arise over the ownership of the domain names, which ultimately decides the boundary of space that a person can exclusively obtain. Ownership of domain names has been obtained by the first-come, first-serve principle, which may comprise an important part of the code of cyberspace. Whoever contemplates and sees a value in a certain domain name first, gets to register the name and owns it. When there is another person who claims a right in the domain name that has already been registered by another person, disputes arise between the two. Most of the early conflicts and disputes were solved by the code of cyberspace combined by rules of the real space. The person who first registered the domain name has a right in the name, and if other person wants the domain name afterwards, he should convince the original owner to transfer the name by compensating for the

Authors: Woo, Jisuk.
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6
horsemen and plainsmen, and of defenders of society combating outlaws. To oppose an
outlaw, people had to rely on even more violence, by the man whose gun would be used
in defense of society (Rosa, 1969, p. 54). In the hands of an expert gunfighter, it was a
highly persuasive instrument of law and order (Rosa, 1969, p. 28). As revealed in
different perceptions and attitudes toward gunfighters ranging from hatred to hero-
worship (Rosa, 1969, p. 11), the gun was the instrument of both lawmaker and
lawbreaker (Rosa, 1969, p. 5). The gun presented a different sense of equality as
whoever with skills with the gun had many things in their favor. “God created man, but
it was Sam Colt’s revolver that made him equal” was the proverb of the frontier (Lewis,
1996, p. 257). However, for most people without such a skill, the gun was an instrument
of “fear” that forced them to comply against their will, whether it was used by the
lawmen or the outlaws. Big ranchers and farmers hired these gunmen to kill
homesteaders and protect their properties (Lewis, 1996, p. 251). Money and skills in
gunfighting were two important elements of power and compliance in the West.
Thus the frontier was “lawless” in terms of the absence and lack of formal laws
and enforcement as required by older social conditions, but operated under the guidance
of its own code and social order that was developed under the special circumstances of
the West. In this frontier situation, the westerner was responding to the demands of the
moment, while the easterner abided by formal convention (Rosa, 1969, p. 25).
Lawlessness as the Code in Cyberspace
Cyberspace is a frontier for many people living in real space. It is a new,
promised, and seemingly unlimited space, to which they are willing to enter and look
for new activities, new experiences, and new ownership. Conflicts and disputes are
bound to occur in this untamed space, and a significant amount of disputes arise over
the ownership of the domain names, which ultimately decides the boundary of space
that a person can exclusively obtain. Ownership of domain names has been obtained by
the first-come, first-serve principle, which may comprise an important part of the code
of cyberspace. Whoever contemplates and sees a value in a certain domain name first,
gets to register the name and owns it. When there is another person who claims a right
in the domain name that has already been registered by another person, disputes arise
between the two.
Most of the early conflicts and disputes were solved by the code of cyberspace
combined by rules of the real space. The person who first registered the domain name
has a right in the name, and if other person wants the domain name afterwards, he
should convince the original owner to transfer the name by compensating for the


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