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Frontier Compliance: A Communication System Emerging in Cyberspace
Unformatted Document Text:  8 solve the new and complex issues involving domain name disputes. Domain name disputes present many complex and unprecedented issues, it is difficult to find precedents in formal laws that could be directly applied to specific cases. In sum, cyberspace was in many ways beyond the reach of the old, traditional legal system. Participants in the efforts of going about their businesses and maximizing their interests attempt to find and invest in valuable domain names by using their knowledge and understanding. When participants failed to do so before other person registers the domain name of his interest, he seeks to purchase the domain name by using his money. Therefore, in the frontier conditions of cyberspace, people used knowledge and money to secure the ownership of domains rather than relying on the traditional legal system. Attempts for Self-Governance Vigilantism and Other Pseudo-Legal Methods In the absence of formal laws, and perceiving the lack of law and order, settlers of the West began to devise pseudo-legal or extra-legal methods to protect their interests and to enforce the laws the way they saw fit. Some territories created special bodies to assist in law enforcement such as rangers and highwaymen, and Indian reservations too had their own police forces (Lewis, 1996, p. 263). Mine owners, bankers, and railroad companies found their own guards and detectives, or hired services from the Pinkerton Detective Agency (Lewis, 1996, p. 263). Miners in California formed committees or courts to handle civil cases (Rosa, 1969, p. 19). Disputes about mining claims and other matters were resolved by vigilance committees, each of which elected a jury, with the active participation and support of the miners (Rosa, 1969, p. 19). These attempts to take the law into one’s own hands by developing some form of extra-legal committees was a defining part of the frontier experiences to establish order that maximizes the frontiersmen’s interests. Because of the lack of established, well-respected government, the West proliferated with vigilance committees and other extra-legal agencies. And even though settlers imitated the forms of government of the place they had come from, at least in form if not in substance: the sheriff and the justice court, most justices on the frontier had no legal training and little knowledge of the law (Lewis, 1996, p. 260). Oftentimes outlaws and gunfighters find themselves serving as sheriffs and marshals, and were expected to maintain a state of order, although they were hired for their skill with guns and not for their policing abilities (Rosa, 1969, p. 11). As the efforts to bring the eastern law to the West were not successful, the vigilantes became

Authors: Woo, Jisuk.
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8
solve the new and complex issues involving domain name disputes. Domain name
disputes present many complex and unprecedented issues, it is difficult to find
precedents in formal laws that could be directly applied to specific cases.
In sum, cyberspace was in many ways beyond the reach of the old, traditional
legal system. Participants in the efforts of going about their businesses and maximizing
their interests attempt to find and invest in valuable domain names by using their
knowledge and understanding. When participants failed to do so before other person
registers the domain name of his interest, he seeks to purchase the domain name by
using his money. Therefore, in the frontier conditions of cyberspace, people used
knowledge and money to secure the ownership of domains rather than relying on the
traditional legal system.
Attempts for Self-Governance
Vigilantism and Other Pseudo-Legal Methods
In the absence of formal laws, and perceiving the lack of law and order, settlers
of the West began to devise pseudo-legal or extra-legal methods to protect their interests
and to enforce the laws the way they saw fit. Some territories created special bodies to
assist in law enforcement such as rangers and highwaymen, and Indian reservations too
had their own police forces (Lewis, 1996, p. 263). Mine owners, bankers, and railroad
companies found their own guards and detectives, or hired services from the Pinkerton
Detective Agency (Lewis, 1996, p. 263). Miners in California formed committees or
courts to handle civil cases (Rosa, 1969, p. 19). Disputes about mining claims and other
matters were resolved by vigilance committees, each of which elected a jury, with the
active participation and support of the miners (Rosa, 1969, p. 19). These attempts to
take the law into one’s own hands by developing some form of extra-legal committees
was a defining part of the frontier experiences to establish order that maximizes the
frontiersmen’s interests. Because of the lack of established, well-respected government,
the West proliferated with vigilance committees and other extra-legal agencies.
And even though settlers imitated the forms of government of the place they
had come from, at least in form if not in substance: the sheriff and the justice court,
most justices on the frontier had no legal training and little knowledge of the law (Lewis,
1996, p. 260). Oftentimes outlaws and gunfighters find themselves serving as sheriffs
and marshals, and were expected to maintain a state of order, although they were hired
for their skill with guns and not for their policing abilities (Rosa, 1969, p. 11). As the
efforts to bring the eastern law to the West were not successful, the vigilantes became


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